What is going to be your endgame speaker?

tima

Industry Expert
Mar 3, 2014
5,721
6,735
1,400
the Upper Midwest
Your position is based on the premise that all things are constantly improving, which I do not ascribe to. Although it is part of many companies marketing strategy that they are constantly evolving toward perfection, many of us don't view it that way.

The 'evolving' is partly a function of the manufacturer having a need to keep his brand before the public eye. (Same with some audiophiles who keep themselves before a social media audience by continualy changing to the latest products.)

Granted there are occasional improvements in materials and small part components, such as capacitors or printed-circuit boards. Sometimes use of these get slip-streamed into a build and sometimes they are touted as a new model. Sometimes features of a higher level model get passed down the line to other models. Typically product roadmaps are planned out for several years.

New products mean new advertising and reviews. In general the audiophile press does not cover products over a year-or-so old.

Plenty of market churn there is.The manufacturer who gets it right early on is at a disadvantage.
 

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
22,317
13,327
2,710
London
Surely. If I had five times more resources than I have my next speakers would be different ...
When you had the XLF, you might have wished you had fewer resources. Would have ended up with something better, like quads, ML hybrids, Devores etc.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Lagonda

dcathro

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2016
566
713
228
Melbourne, Australia
I know. You have posed the idea that there is hyper detail that is not really present and detracts from the music. I have no idea what this means.

The impression of detail can be heightened or reduced through many mechanisms - frequency response, time alignment, phase response, resonance/vibration management, etc. For example if you boost treble/upper midrange there will be more apparent detail, same if you reduce midbass. If you do the opposite you will get more warmth and less detail. Too much and you get into muddiness. By changing driver alignments you will also affect the impression of detail. Changing the spikes/support on your speakers also.

It's not just speakers, all the way through the chain, the design choices determine how much detail you perceive and how it is organized. If I swap the AC output phase of the Power transformer in any of my equipment I will get more perceived detail at the expense of smoothness and coherence.
Here we’re talking about speakers … and because they are electro mechanical devices with the job of exciting the air in a believable way, their task is especially complex. They rarely fully succeed. But more often than not, they succeed in some portion of their goal to attract buyers.

Different listeners are attracted to different aspects of speaker success. This is another of those issues where human differences in hearing and psychological preferences guide what each of us likes.
Sure, we cannot have it all, we need to chose from:

how flat a frequency response
how extended the frequency response - e.g. 10hz to 50kHz
how high the sensitivity
how important is the radation pattern
does coherency matter (time alignment, phase coherency, crossover design)
ease of drive
the rigidity of enclosure
the size of the speaker
the speaker cosmetics

My friend values coherency above everything else, so he chose to sacrifice frequency extension and flat frequency response and went for a "full range" single driver speaker. He also got good sensitivity and an easy to drive impedance allowing the use of small powered SET amps which are extremely involving musically.

Coherence is also very important to me, but I cannot live with a single driver speaker. I need more extension (35Hz to 18KHz) and a flatter frequency response. I therefore go for either a 2-way or very carefully designed 3-way.

As you go for greater frequency extension, the requirement for more drivers increases and you have to sacrifice other variables such as cabinet size, easy to drive impedance, sensitivity, etc. More drivers and bigger cabinets requires greater engineering to have rigid cabinets, and the crossovers get very complicated. Less efficient, low impedance speakers require massive power amps that in themselves tend to be missing in the musicality stakes
My goal for this thread is to point out that for listeners like me, there is no end game.

That's great!! You are happy and enjoy the hobby along with the excitement for your future upgrades.

Enjoy what you have, but if you get curious, why not indulge your curiosity and consider other options as they present themselves with convincing cases? There is no need for an end game. The game is continuously afoot.

I have only been in the hobby for 50 years. I have worked in both the hifi industry and the pro/recording side. I have friends that are reviewers and designers and have learned a lot from them. I hope to stay humble enough to keep learning.

I know what I want from my music system and very satisfied with my current gear - I am particularly sensitive to rhythm and timing and musical flow. I do upgrade, but these are usually small things (e.g. I just changed the RCA connectors on my ICs from brass to NextGen Copper, and the feet under my power amp)

I got into DIY 30 years ago and learned a lot quickly by making every mistake in the book. I have a favourite pair of 2-way monitors (1st order linear phase) designed by Chris Bryant and Martin Colloms which do most of what I value. I have build external crossovers for them and have used the highest level of parts connectors, and wire.

My end game speakers are a 3-way speaker that I have been building myself for the past 13 years (I spent a year on them, got interrupted and then started again during our famous Melbourne CV lock down). This is my attempt to do everything that is important to me, that no manufacturer does.

Coherency comes first so a full range Supravox driver operating from 180Hz to 6KHz, a Wolf Von Langa 15" bass 30Hz to 180Hz and Seas Exotic Alnico 1.5" tweeter from 5Khz up. The crossover is external, 1st order with the best parts. The Supravox is open baffle for reduced cabinet coloration and all the drivers are time aligned. The sensitivity is 94db with an 8ohm load and the phase is within +/- 20deg.

I am continually experimenting with the fine tuning of these, but they do what my mini monitors (a bit better) plus they scale better, go lower and are more dynamic. They don't go below 20Hz and they don't go above 20KHz.

I go to shows (always a disappointment if you expect good sound) and visit a lot of other people and am always open to learning.

Sorry this response is so long :)
 
Last edited:

dcathro

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2016
566
713
228
Melbourne, Australia
The 'evolving' is partly a function of the manufacturer having a need to keep his brand before the public eye. (Same with some audiophiles who keep themselves before a social media audience by continualy changing to the latest products.)

Granted there are occasional improvements in materials and small part components, such as capacitors or printed-circuit boards. Sometimes use of these get slip-streamed into a build and sometimes they are touted as a new model. Sometimes features of a higher level model get passed down the line to other models. Typically product roadmaps are planned out for several years.

New products mean new advertising and reviews. In general the audiophile press does not cover products over a year-or-so old.

Plenty of market churn there is.The manufacturer who gets it right early on is at a disadvantage.

You do have to take your hat off to those companies who are able to successfully engage their clients and repeatedly take their money over a long period of time.

There have been some great products that have slipped through the cracks and forgotten about without anyone really knowing.

There have also been a lot of very ordinary products that have big reputations.
 

Rexp

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2022
743
278
73
60
My endgame speaker will have solid 3d imaging, reveal subtle nuances and have effortless dynamics. Haven't found it yet.
 

LL21

Well-Known Member
Dec 26, 2010
14,358
2,481
1,398
When you had the XLF, you might have wished you had fewer resources. Would have ended up with something better, like quads, ML hybrids, Devores etc.
As with all things, its about priorities. In the case of wonderful speakers like Quads, ML Hybrids, Guarneris, even my preference over all pf these (Apogees), I elected years ago to go with X1/Grand SLAMMS, to bypass the X2 series and then go to XLF because I found it offered the ability to scale effortlessly (which I could never get with Quads), to reveal nuance and body (which I could not find with ML which had nuance but not the body for me) and also to demonstrate power in a way that even the wonderful Apogees could not quite grasp...though I have not heard the Apogee Grands with the big self-contained dual-subs.

No speaker is perfect, but the XLFs have an excellent balance of the above in a way that whether it is Hans Zimmer, Oscar Peterson, Dr Dre or Jacqueline du Pre or Suzuki conducting Bach...there is a fulsome sense of body, a tonal balance that with Zanden/Robert Koda has some magic, and a completeness of scale/power that even at low levels I really enjoy.

Is it a panel? It is not. Is it an Avant Garde Trio? Definitely not. But there are things about the system with the XLFs (particularly effortless power) which I really enjoy and prioritize above other things. I have often said I am not a detail person when it comes to music, and while the XLF presents excellent detail, I do think there are speakers who do more and better in that one area.

Overall, I think where David Wilson got it right is he created a speaker that in the right hands could be tailored to any room and system...that flexibility is both a blessing and a curse...in the hands of Pedro at Absolute Sounds, definitely the former. And he also decided to create his own balance of traits which I find beguiling...and practical. At a 20" x 28" footprint, it works extremely well in lots of domestic environments which many other speakers which are about power and scale do not.

I continue to look at horns long term because I suspect they could create magic, scale and power while also introducing a special sense of detail and nuance, and someday may well venture that way...something which we have discussed...but the sheer footprint is daunting having just seen the Avantgarde Trios with dual horns in person. In fact, I just was speaking with a dealer who knows of an Avantgarde Trio owner whose spouse said 'no more...too big'...and he went to XVX.
 
Last edited:

AudioHR

VIP/Donor
Feb 11, 2023
203
194
90
70
High River, Alberta Canada
The impression of detail can be heightened or reduced through many mechanisms - frequency response, time alignment, phase response, resonance/vibration management, etc. For example if you boost treble/upper midrange there will be more apparent detail, same if you reduce midbass. If you do the opposite you will get more warmth and less detail. Too much and you get into muddiness. By changing driver alignments you will also affect the impression of detail. Changing the spikes/support on your speakers also.

It's not just speakers, all the way through the chain, the design choices determine how much detail you perceive and how it is organized. If I swap the AC output phase of the Power transformer in any of my equipment I will get more perceived detail at the expense of smoothness and coherence.

Sure, we cannot have it all, we need to chose from:

how flat a frequency response
how extended the frequency response - e.g. 10hz to 50kHz
how high the sensitivity
how important is the radation pattern
does coherency matter (time alignment, phase coherency, crossover design)
ease of drive
the rigidity of enclosure
the size of the speaker
the speaker cosmetics

My friends value coherency above everything else, so he chose to sacrifice frequency extension and flat frequency response and went for a "full range" single driver speaker. He also got good sensitivity and an easy to drive impedance allowing the use of small powered SET amps which are extremely involving musically.

Coherence is also very important to me, but I cannot live with a single driver speaker. I need more extension (35Hz to 18KHz) and a flatter frequency response. I therefore go for either a 2-way or very carefully designed 3-way.

As you go for greater frequency extension, the requirement for more drivers increases and you have to sacrifice other variables such as cabinet size, easy to drive impedance, sensitivity, etc. More drivers and bigger cabinets requires greater engineering to have rigid cabinets, and the crossovers get very complicated. Less efficient, low impedance speakers require massive power amps that in themselves tend to be missing in the musicality stakes


That's great!! You are happy and enjoy the hobby along with the excitement for your future upgrades.



I have only been in the hobby for 50 years. I have worked in both the hifi industry and the pro/recording side. I have friends that are reviewers and designers and have learned a lot from them. I hope to stay humble enough to keep learning.

I know what I want from my music system and very satisfied with my current gear - I am particularly sensitive to rhythm and timing and musical flow. I do upgrade, but these are usually small things (e.g. I just changed the RCA connectors on my ICs from brass to NextGen Copper, and the feet under my power amp)

I got into DIY 30 years ago and learned a lot quickly by making every mistake in the book. I have a favourite pair of 2-way monitors (1st order linear phase) designed by Chris Bryant and Martin Colloms which do most of what I value. I have build external crossovers for them and have used the highest level of parts connectors, and wire.

My end game speakers are a 3-way speaker that I have been building myself for the past 13 years (I spent a year on them, got interrupted and then started again during our famous Melbourne CV lock down. This is my attempt to do everything that is important to me, that no manufacturer does.

Coherency comes first so a full range Supravox driver operating from 180Hz to 6KHz, a Wolf Von Langa 15" bass 30Hz to 180Hz and Seas Exotic Alnico 1.5" tweeter from 5Khz up. The crossover is external, 1st order with the best parts. The Supravox is open baffle for reduced cabinet coloration and all the drivers are time aligned. The sensitivity is 94db with an 8ohm load and the phase is within +/- 20deg.

I am continually experimenting with the fine tuning of these, but they do what my mini monitors (a bit better) plus they scale better, go lower and are more dynamic. They don't go below 20Hz and they don't go above 20KHz.

I go to shows (always a disappointment if you expect good sound) and visit a lot of other people and am always open to learning.

Sorry this response is so long :)
No need for apologies, it was a great response!
 

Another Johnson

VIP/Donor
Jan 13, 2022
863
1,001
275
USA
The impression of detail can be heightened or reduced through many mechanisms - frequency response, time alignment, phase response, resonance/vibration management, etc. For example if you boost treble/upper midrange there will be more apparent detail, same if you reduce midbass. If you do the opposite you will get more warmth and less detail. Too much and you get into muddiness. By changing driver alignments you will also affect the impression of detail. Changing the spikes/support on your speakers also.

It's not just speakers, all the way through the chain, the design choices determine how much detail you perceive and how it is organized. If I swap the AC output phase of the Power transformer in any of my equipment I will get more perceived detail at the expense of smoothness and coherence.

Sure, we cannot have it all, we need to chose from:

how flat a frequency response
how extended the frequency response - e.g. 10hz to 50kHz
how high the sensitivity
how important is the radation pattern
does coherency matter (time alignment, phase coherency, crossover design)
ease of drive
the rigidity of enclosure
the size of the speaker
the speaker cosmetics

My friends value coherency above everything else, so he chose to sacrifice frequency extension and flat frequency response and went for a "full range" single driver speaker. He also got good sensitivity and an easy to drive impedance allowing the use of small powered SET amps which are extremely involving musically.

Coherence is also very important to me, but I cannot live with a single driver speaker. I need more extension (35Hz to 18KHz) and a flatter frequency response. I therefore go for either a 2-way or very carefully designed 3-way.

As you go for greater frequency extension, the requirement for more drivers increases and you have to sacrifice other variables such as cabinet size, easy to drive impedance, sensitivity, etc. More drivers and bigger cabinets requires greater engineering to have rigid cabinets, and the crossovers get very complicated. Less efficient, low impedance speakers require massive power amps that in themselves tend to be missing in the musicality stakes


That's great!! You are happy and enjoy the hobby along with the excitement for your future upgrades.



I have only been in the hobby for 50 years. I have worked in both the hifi industry and the pro/recording side. I have friends that are reviewers and designers and have learned a lot from them. I hope to stay humble enough to keep learning.

I know what I want from my music system and very satisfied with my current gear - I am particularly sensitive to rhythm and timing and musical flow. I do upgrade, but these are usually small things (e.g. I just changed the RCA connectors on my ICs from brass to NextGen Copper, and the feet under my power amp)

I got into DIY 30 years ago and learned a lot quickly by making every mistake in the book. I have a favourite pair of 2-way monitors (1st order linear phase) designed by Chris Bryant and Martin Colloms which do most of what I value. I have build external crossovers for them and have used the highest level of parts connectors, and wire.

My end game speakers are a 3-way speaker that I have been building myself for the past 13 years (I spent a year on them, got interrupted and then started again during our famous Melbourne CV lock down. This is my attempt to do everything that is important to me, that no manufacturer does.

Coherency comes first so a full range Supravox driver operating from 180Hz to 6KHz, a Wolf Von Langa 15" bass 30Hz to 180Hz and Seas Exotic Alnico 1.5" tweeter from 5Khz up. The crossover is external, 1st order with the best parts. The Supravox is open baffle for reduced cabinet coloration and all the drivers are time aligned. The sensitivity is 94db with an 8ohm load and the phase is within +/- 20deg.

I am continually experimenting with the fine tuning of these, but they do what my mini monitors (a bit better) plus they scale better, go lower and are more dynamic. They don't go below 20Hz and they don't go above 20KHz.

I go to shows (always a disappointment if you expect good sound) and visit a lot of other people and am always open to learning.

Sorry this response is so long :)
Actually, this is another patented WBF response that insults the quoted by explaining that we all hear alike, and that the poster’s ears are the master template.
And it accrues many likes from the like minded.

There are no editors … it is a fatal flaw.
 

christoph

Well-Known Member
Dec 11, 2015
4,636
4,031
825
Principality of Liechtenstein

microstrip

VIP/Donor
May 30, 2010
20,806
4,697
2,790
Portugal
When you had the XLF, you might have wished you had fewer resources. Would have ended up with something better, like quads, ML hybrids, Devores etc.

The XLF's were by far the best speaker I have ever owned. I (and friends, I must say) had great times listening and playing with them. I only parted with them because I am moving to a larger, but vaulted ceiling space and the XLF's unfortunately seem too tall for the space. Now listening to Soundlab A1Px's, probably four Quad ESL63 in a SME room type arrangement will be my intermediate speaker.

My system with the XLF's, ARC REF40 preamp, VTL Siegfried II , dCS Vivaldi stack with the Taiko could probably be my endgame if this hobby was just enjoyement of music, but I accept that it is also an addiction to discovery and experiences with stereo - IMO much more enjoyable than barking to the passing caravanes.
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: Lagonda and AudioHR

microstrip

VIP/Donor
May 30, 2010
20,806
4,697
2,790
Portugal
  • Like
Reactions: christoph

microstrip

VIP/Donor
May 30, 2010
20,806
4,697
2,790
Portugal
The impression of detail can be heightened or reduced through many mechanisms - frequency response, time alignment, phase response, resonance/vibration management, etc. For example if you boost treble/upper midrange there will be more apparent detail, same if you reduce midbass. If you do the opposite you will get more warmth and less detail. Too much and you get into muddiness. By changing driver alignments you will also affect the impression of detail. Changing the spikes/support on your speakers also.

It's not just speakers, all the way through the chain, the design choices determine how much detail you perceive and how it is organized. If I swap the AC output phase of the Power transformer in any of my equipment I will get more perceived detail at the expense of smoothness and coherence.

Sure, we cannot have it all, we need to chose from:

how flat a frequency response
how extended the frequency response - e.g. 10hz to 50kHz
how high the sensitivity
how important is the radation pattern
does coherency matter (time alignment, phase coherency, crossover design)
ease of drive
the rigidity of enclosure
the size of the speaker
the speaker cosmetics

My friends value coherency above everything else, so he chose to sacrifice frequency extension and flat frequency response and went for a "full range" single driver speaker. He also got good sensitivity and an easy to drive impedance allowing the use of small powered SET amps which are extremely involving musically.

Coherence is also very important to me, but I cannot live with a single driver speaker. I need more extension (35Hz to 18KHz) and a flatter frequency response. I therefore go for either a 2-way or very carefully designed 3-way.

As you go for greater frequency extension, the requirement for more drivers increases and you have to sacrifice other variables such as cabinet size, easy to drive impedance, sensitivity, etc. More drivers and bigger cabinets requires greater engineering to have rigid cabinets, and the crossovers get very complicated. Less efficient, low impedance speakers require massive power amps that in themselves tend to be missing in the musicality stakes


That's great!! You are happy and enjoy the hobby along with the excitement for your future upgrades.



I have only been in the hobby for 50 years. I have worked in both the hifi industry and the pro/recording side. I have friends that are reviewers and designers and have learned a lot from them. I hope to stay humble enough to keep learning.

I know what I want from my music system and very satisfied with my current gear - I am particularly sensitive to rhythm and timing and musical flow. I do upgrade, but these are usually small things (e.g. I just changed the RCA connectors on my ICs from brass to NextGen Copper, and the feet under my power amp)

I got into DIY 30 years ago and learned a lot quickly by making every mistake in the book. I have a favourite pair of 2-way monitors (1st order linear phase) designed by Chris Bryant and Martin Colloms which do most of what I value. I have build external crossovers for them and have used the highest level of parts connectors, and wire.

My end game speakers are a 3-way speaker that I have been building myself for the past 13 years (I spent a year on them, got interrupted and then started again during our famous Melbourne CV lock down. This is my attempt to do everything that is important to me, that no manufacturer does.

Coherency comes first so a full range Supravox driver operating from 180Hz to 6KHz, a Wolf Von Langa 15" bass 30Hz to 180Hz and Seas Exotic Alnico 1.5" tweeter from 5Khz up. The crossover is external, 1st order with the best parts. The Supravox is open baffle for reduced cabinet coloration and all the drivers are time aligned. The sensitivity is 94db with an 8ohm load and the phase is within +/- 20deg.

I am continually experimenting with the fine tuning of these, but they do what my mini monitors (a bit better) plus they scale better, go lower and are more dynamic. They don't go below 20Hz and they don't go above 20KHz.

I go to shows (always a disappointment if you expect good sound) and visit a lot of other people and am always open to learning.

Sorry this response is so long :)

A long response to tell us about your credentials and that you joined the DIY community in this hobby. A valid approach that I respect and would love to join if I had the time and motivation, but surely can't be considered an example of endgame.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AudioHR

LL21

Well-Known Member
Dec 26, 2010
14,358
2,481
1,398
Three letters - XVX, but also a new, taller space ... :cool:
Intriguing...for those in Asia who have spent real time with it...a number of them were extremely impressed and some even suggest they prefer it to WAMM. If I get the chance to spend more time with it, I will.
 

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 24, 2015
15,872
13,050
2,665
Beverly Hills, CA
Intriguing...for those in Asia who have spent real time with it...a number of them were extremely impressed and some even suggest they prefer it to WAMM. If I get the chance to spend more time with it, I will.

Except for "bragging rights" I don't know why anybody would order a WAMM over an XVX, and forgo the brilliant new alnico midrange.
 

andromedaaudio

VIP/Donor
Jan 23, 2011
8,284
2,677
1,400
Amsterdam holland
My end game speaker is a coherent balanced speaker.
One i have been enjoying now for years .
Other designs i could be a happy with , Rockport Lyra , Kharma exquisite classic , Magico V3 and S5 mk1 and 2, Vivid Giya ( possibly )
 

AudioHR

VIP/Donor
Feb 11, 2023
203
194
90
70
High River, Alberta Canada
Actually, this is another patented WBF response that insults the quoted by explaining that we all hear alike, and that the poster’s ears are the master template.
And it accrues many likes from the like minded.

There are no editors … it is a fatal flaw.
I didn't come away with that takeaway after I read it! His perspective made sense to me so I liked it.

Of course we don't perceive sound or many things for that matter the same way. He in my mind was explaining what his preferences were and what things influenced what he was hearing.
 

LL21

Well-Known Member
Dec 26, 2010
14,358
2,481
1,398
Except for "bragging rights" I don't know why anybody would order a WAMM over an XVX, and forgo the brilliant new alnico midrange.
Thanks, Ron. Very helpful. I still have my 'listening notes' from the day I auditioned the XVX and the Robert Kodas. There was certainly a unique ability to discern intonations and nuances and with serious depth in the mids as well as generally across the full spectrum.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Ron Resnick

thomask

Well-Known Member
Dec 9, 2018
1,572
1,492
245
64
Washington State, US
Endgame speaker will depend on personal taste, budget and size of listening room.

On 1989, I lived in apartment at Chicago with 15feet W 20 feet D 8 feet H listeing space.

I had auditioned ML CLS, several Apogee and other box speakers.

After auditioning several choices, my endgame speaker on 1989 turned out to be Apogee Diva driven by Krell KSA 250.

But I could not afford it at that time, thus I had settled at Apogee Duetta Sig driven by Krell KSA 150.

I had been happy with Apogee Duetta Sig driven by Krell KSA 150. until 1998.



But I want deeper bass and switched to Avalon Ascent II which sound too bright with Krell amp.

Thus I switched to Jadia 200 and then Jadia 500.

Avalon Ascent II driven by Jadis 500 sound very musical with no serious faults at all.

But one audio dealer offered big discount on Wilson Watt Puppy 5 and I switched to it on 2001

Watt Puppy 5 gave nice details with 3 d soundstage but too bright for my taste.

I used DCS Elgar and upsampler fed by CEC TLX 0 using volume of Elgar without any pre amp.

Thus I let Watt Puppy 5 go only after 6 months and got B&W Notilus 800 instead.

I had enjoyed B&W Notilus 800 driven by Jadis 500 from 2002 to 2004

It had given most powerful bass that I had experienced in my listening space.


On 2004, Mr Chung of Silbatone who is a close friend of mine recommended me to try full range speaker(6 inch driver) with his Silbatone 300B SET.

While I enjoy Jadis 500, I could not play it during summer due to too much heat.

Thus I followed Mr Chung's recommendation.

Full range speaker(6 inch driver) driven by Silbatone 300B.SET gave gracious sound with nice tonality, but no serious bass or dynamics.

After using full range speaker for two years, I swithced to Lansche 4.1 on 2006.

At that time my listening room was rather small 10 ft W 15 ft D 7 ft H.

Lansche 4.1 driven by Silbatone 300B SET. fitted by WE 300b made in 1950's gave perfect sound in the small listeing space with clean and sublime lady vocal, nice dynamics and timber.

But after moving to larger listening spcae of 15 ft W 20ft D 12 ft H, Silbatone 300B SET. could not drive Lansche 4.1 with enough power.

Thus I had to switch to higher power tube amp to drive Lansche 4.1

On 2021 I got Altec A7 which gave unlimited dynamcis and vintage flavor.

On 2022, I also assembled Scaena 3.2 which I got used on 2020 but could not assemble it during Corona pandemic.

Scaena 3.2 gave very realistic placement of each instrument in deep and wide soundstage but not going deep enough below 30 hz.

After getting pair of Rel 31s April this year, Scaena 3.2 augmented by pair of Rel 31s really sings with nimble and deep bass.

During last two years, I attended Pacific Audiofest 2022, 2023 and Seoul Audio Show 2023.

If I choose one speaker that impressed me is big Genesis with natural and lifelike dynamics from reel tape as source.

But it is too big for my current listening space of 16 ft wide 20 ft deep 15ft to 20 feet sloped ceiling.

I am too lazy to build larger dedicated listening space.

4S4A2608cd-3-22.JPG

I wil use my currrent house as is.

If i start new, i may choose either MBL 101e or Asylvox planar.


But as I am happy with my current speakers, it will be side grade.

_DSC1462pet-2 (2).jpg

Songer Audio field coil speaker also sounds fresh and fast which may fit for second listing space on the third flooer.



For the time being, I will take turns between Scaena 3.2, Lansche 4.1 and Altec A7 depending on my mood and music.

in the future, I would like to get genuine WE vintage horn system.

20181205_145401-23.jpg

I found one in good condition on 2020 at Seoul, Korea.

It sounds very natural and fast with unlimited dynamics driven by 20 Watts tube amp.

But at that time, I was hesitant to withdraw 250k $ from my stock account.

If I find similar one again, I may jump at it as my endgame speaker.
 
Last edited:

dcathro

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2016
566
713
228
Melbourne, Australia
Actually, this is another patented WBF response that insults the quoted by explaining that we all hear alike, and that the poster’s ears are the master template.
And it accrues many likes from the like minded.

There are no editors … it is a fatal flaw.

I am sorry if you were insulted by my response, that was not my intention! I am actually careful to not insult people as it is one of the things I dislike about forums and the internet.

I was attempting to explain MY preferences and compromises from the vast possibilities that are available in a loudspeaker. I am aware that many others like yourself have different taste and preferences to myself. Even within my local circle there is no consensus.
 

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. This is THE place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss vintage, contemporary and new audio products, music servers, music streamers, computer audio, digital-to-analog converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel-to-reel tape machines, speakers, headphones and tube and solid-state amplification. Founded in 2010 What’s Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals, we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people, and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing