WBF Library: Human hearing system and acoustics

Apr 3, 2010
16,022
0
0
Seattle, WA
#1
This is a library thread on the best papers and presentations on the topic of what we hear and why.

I will keep this first post updated with suggestions from everyone.

General
Nice paper from Bob Stuart on the topic of multi-channel sound and audibility of various signals: http://www.meridian-audio.com/w_paper/multips3.pdf
Collection of papers from "JJ" (James Johnston -- ex-AT&T Bell Labs Fellow): http://www.aes.org/sections/pnw/ppt.htm
Great article on ins and outs of our hearing system: http://www.santafevisions.com/csf/html/lectures/007_hearing_II.htm
Audible Frequencies of Music, Speech and Noise, W. B. Snow: http://www.alcatel-lucent.com/bstj/vol10-1931/articles/bstj10-4-616.pdf

Room Eq
Harman test on a few room correction devices: http://seanolive.blogspot.com/2009/11/subjective-and-objective-evaluation-of.html
Good starting point on building a measurement system for room eq: http://www.mit.edu/~glettler/resume/undergrad/eecs452_A2REq_Final_public.pdf
LISTENING ROOM - CORNER LOADED BASS TRAP: http://www.acousticsciences.com/articles/listening-room-aes-1985-1.htm
Wonderful introduction by Floyd Toole on basics of room setup/EQ: http://www.harmanaudio.com/all_about_audio/acoustical_design.pdf

Acoustics
NRC measurement system: http://www.acousticsciences.com/Voices-of-NRC.pdf
RPG on acoustics: http://www.rpginc.com/news/library.htm
Online book on acoustics and psychoacoustics, plus lots of related lectures: http://www.santafevisions.com/csf/html/index.htm
The measurement chapter from Davis and Patronis Sound System Engineering is online here: http://www.focalpress.com/uploadedFi...0240808307.pdf
Master Handbook of Acoustics: well worth investment to buy the book
BBC R&D: http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/index.shtml - here's an excellent book on acoustics: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/a...icpractice.pdf

Fazenda et al., “Perception of low frequencies in small rooms", Proceedings of the European Acoustics Symposium, September 2004, Guimaraes, Portugal
http://www.sea-acustica.es/Guimaraes04/ID45.pdf

Goldberg, “Finding the audibility of the temporal decay rate of a low frequency room mode” (2005)
http://www.acoustics.hut.fi/asf/publicat/akup05/goldberg.pdf


Linkwitz, "Room Reflections Misunderstood", Audio Eng. Soc. preprint 7162
http://www.linkwitzlab.com/AES'07/AES123-final2.pdf


Merimaa, “Analysis, synthesis and perception of spatial sound – binaural localization modelling and multichannel loudspeaker reproduction”, Dissertation Helsinki University of Technology, 2006
http://lib.tkk.fi/Diss/2006/isbn9512282917/isbn9512282917.pdf

Rubak, “Coloration in room impulse response”, Joint Balti-Nordic Acoustics Meeting 2004, 8-10 June, Mariehamn, Åland
http://www.acoustics.hut.fi/asf/bnam04/webprosari/papers/o23.pdf

Spring et al., “The measurement of sound diffusion index in small rooms”, BBC RD 1969/16
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1969-16.pdf

Taylor, “A preliminary study of the influence of room mode structure on sound absorption”, BBC RD 1983/4
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1983-04.pdf

Taylor, “Room modes and sound measurement: some practical measurements compared with theoretical predictions”, BBC RD 1985/11
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1985-11.pdf

Toole, “Loudspeakers and rooms for sound reproduction – a scientific review”, J. of the Audio Engineering Society 2006, p.451
http://www.harman.com/EN-US/OurComp...p/Documents/Scientific Publications/13686.pdf

Voetmann, “50 years of sound control room design”
http://www.madebydelta.com/imported/images/DELTA_Web/documents/TC/acoustics/av126205.pdf

Walker, “A preliminary investigation into the measurement of time and frequency response of listening rooms and control cubicles”, BBC RD 1979/9
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1979-09.pdf

Walker, “Low-frequency room responses: Part 1 -- Background and qualitative considerations, “BBC RD 1992/8
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1992-08.pdf

Walker, “Low-frequency room responses: Part 2 -- Calculation methods and experimental results”, BBC RD 1992/9
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1992-09.pdf

Walker, “High frequency room responses: Acoustic design and the control of stereophonic image quality”, BBC RD 1994/11
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1994-11.pdf

Walker, “CONTROLLED IMAGE DESIGN: The measurement of Time-Frequency responses”, BBC RD 1995/3
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-03.pdf

Walker, “Controlled Image Design: The management of stereophonic image quality”, BBC RD 1995/4
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-04.pdf

Walker, “Controlled Image Designs: Results from the first installations”, BBC RD 1995/5
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-05.pdf

How the Ear Works - Nature's Solutions for Listening:
http://www.bcm.edu/oto/index.cfm?pmid=15095

Standard passive models of the ear do not account for the phenomenal sensitivity and selectivity of human hearing. The most compelling hypothesis has been the Cochlear Amplifier. However, at this time, all the details of how this amplification can be achieved is still not known. A fairly exhaustive review paper as of 2001 on how the cochlea works is available here:
http://cbt.beckman.uiuc.edu/papers_spring06/raven.pdf

Prof David Kemp discovered Otoacoustic Emissions in 1977 - today, it is primarily used for early detection of hearing loss and most of the studies revolve around hearing loss because of the profitability of selling hearing aids. We are still learning about its complexity, and how it enhances the hearing ability - especially in the presence of masking noise.
http://www.est-med.com/OAE/understanding-using_OAE von Kemp.pdf

Hearing threshold for pure tones above 20 kHz: http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/ast/27/1/12/_pdf

Temporal resolution of hearing probed by bandwidth restriction: http://www.physics.sc.edu/kunchur/temporal.pdf

Perceptual Discrimination between Musical Sounds with and without Very High Frequency Components: http://www.nhk.or.jp/strl/publica/labnote/lab486.html

Good but short reference on hearing research above 20 Khz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypersonic_effect

Live End Dead End studio control room design described by the inventor, in a very accessible writing style.
Don Davis: the LEDE concept, Audio 1987: http://jgbouska.tripod.com/audio/d_d...io_1987_p1.pdf

Psychoacoustics, Neuro-audiology, and Evolutionary Psychology:
I know that they have been recommended elsewhere, but these two books are essential reading to understanding our obsessions.
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain - Oliver Sacks
http://www.amazon.com/Musicophilia-Tales-Music-Revised-Expanded/dp/1400033535/ref=pd_sim_b_4
This is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession - Daniel J. Levitin
http://www.amazon.com/This-Your-Brain-Music-Obsession/dp/0452288525/ref=pd_sim_b_4
Sound Reproduction: The Acoustics and Psychoacoustics of Loudspeakers and Rooms By Floyd Toole. Focal Press, 2008.
Detection Threshold for tones above 22 kHz by Kaoru, A. and Shogo, K. AES Convention Paper 5401, 2001.

Imaging (spatial localization) and Soundstage (auditory scene analysis) -
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~robust/Papers/SternWangBrownChapter.pdf

PRaT (perception of rhythm) and Foot tapping (beat induction) -
Rhythm and Beat Perception in Motor Areas of the brain: http://www.brainmusic.org/EducationalActivitiesFolder/Grahn_rhythm2007.pdf

Contribution of Anthropometric Factors to Individual Differences in Perception of Rhythm: https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/1811/24478/1/EMR000021a-Todd-etal.pdf

Litovsky et al., “The precedence effect”, J. of Acoust. Soc. of America, vol. 106, 1999, p.1633
http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/~litovsky/papers/1999-3.pdf

Salomons, “Coloration and binaural decoloration of sound due to reflections”, Thesis, Delft University 1995
http://repository.tudelft.nl/assets...7f-8d2a-eb5d6cc04fbf/as_salomons_19951220.PDF


Ultrasonic hearing and Hypersonic effect

Ashihara et al., “Detection threshold for tones about 22 kHz”, 110th AES convention 2001, preprint no. 5401

Ashihara “Hearing thresholds for pure tones above 16 kHz”, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 2007, Volume 122, Issue 3, pp. EL52-EL57

D. Griesinger, “Perception of mid frequency and high frequency intermodulation distortion in loudspeakers and its relationship to high-definition audio”, 24th International AES Conference 2003, Banff, Canada
www.davidgriesinger.com/intermod.ppt

Hamasaki et al., “Perceptual Discrimination of Very High Frequency Components in Musical Sound Recorded with a Newly Developed Wide Frequency Range Microphone”, 117th AES convention 2004, preprint no. 6298

Hosoi et al., “Activation of the auditory cortex by ultrasound”, The Lancet, vol. 351, Febr. 14, 1998, p.496

Ishiuchi et al., “Difference tone produced by two ultrasonic components”, Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Biotelemetry, Sep 1990, Yokohama, Japan

Lenhardt, “Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment”, Int. Tinnitus J., vol.9, no.2, pp.69-75 (2003)

Lenhardt, “Eyes as fenestrations to the ears: a novel mechanism for high-frequency and ultrasound hearing”, Int. Tinnitus J., vol.13, no.1, pp.3-10 (2007)

Nakamura et al., “Analysis of music-brain interaction with simultaneous measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and electroencephalogram beta rhythm in human subjects”, Neuroscience Letters 275 (1999), p.222-226

Nishiguchi et al., “Perceptual discrimination between music sounds with and without very high frequency components”, 115th AES convention 2003, preprint no. 5876

Nishiguchi et al., „Perceptual discrimination of very high frequency components in wide frequency range musical sound“, Applied Acoustics 2009, vol. 70, p.921

Nishimura et al., “Ultrasonic masker clarifies ultrasonic perception in man”, Hearing Research 2003, Volume 175, pp.171-177

Omata et al., “A psychoacoustic measurement and ABR for the sound signals in the frequency range between 10 kHz and 24 kHz”, 125th Audio Engineering Society convention 2008, preprint no. 7566

Oohashi et al., “High frequency sound above the audible range affects brain electric activity and sound perception”, 91st AES convention 1991, preprint no. 3207

Oohashi et al., “Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect”, Journal of Neurophysiology 83 (2000), p. 3548-3558
http://www.linearaudio.nl/Documents/high freq inpact on brain.pdf

Oohashi et al., “Multidisciplinary study on the hypersonic effect”, International Congress Series 1226 (2002), pp.27-42

Oohashi et al., “The role of biological systems other than auditory air-conduction in the emergence of the hypersonic effect”, Brain Research 1073-1074 (2006), p. 339-347

Sugimoto et al, “Human perception model for ultrasonic difference tones”, Proceedings of the 24th IASTED International Conference, Feb 16-18, 2005, Innsbruck, Austria

Yagi et al., “Auditory display for deep brain activation: hypersonic effect”,
Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Auditory Display, Kyoto, Japan, July 2-5, 2002
http://www.icad.org/websiteV2.0/Conferences/ICAD2002/proceedings/Oohashi.pdf

Yagi et al., “Modulatory effect of inaudible high-frequency sounds on human acoustic perception”, Neuroscience Letters 351 (2003), p.191-195


Yagi et al., “Modulatory effect of inaudible high-frequency sounds on human acoustic perception”, Neuroscience Letters 351 (2003), p.191-195

Double Blind Tests

"Audibility of a CD-Standard A/D/A Loop Inserted
into High-Resolution Audio Playback" http://drewdaniels.com/audible.pdf

"DVD-Audio versus SACD Perceptual Discrimination of Digital Audio Coding Formats Listening Comparison Test between DSD and High Resolution PCM (24-bit / 176.4 kHz)"
http://old.hfm-detmold.de/eti/projekte/diplomarbeiten/dsdvspcm/aes_paper_6086.pdf

Other
http://www.falstad.com/mathphysics.html - java applets visualizing just about anything
Differencing tool/paper: Detecting Changes in Audio Signals by Digital Differencion
http://www.libinst.com/AES Audio Differencing Paper.pdf
Note: the app crashes on my Windows 7 PC and never finishes no matter what I try to compare.

Perceptual issues: http://www.nousaine.com/pdfs/Can You Trust Your Ears.pdf

Great place to get various test tones: http://www.audiocheck.net/

Room noise level
Nice description of so called "NC rating" of rooms and how that translates into SPL at different frequencies: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/nc-noise-criterion-d_725.html
 

Nordenstam

New Member
Aug 19, 2010
37
0
0
Norway
nordenmaster.no
#3
RPG on acoustics: http://www.rpginc.com/news/library.htm

Online book on acoustics and psychoacoustics, plus lots of related lectures: http://www.santafevisions.com/csf/html/index.htm

The measurement chapter from Davis and Patronis Sound System Engineering is online here: http://www.focalpress.com/uploadedFiles/Books/Book_Media/Audio/9780240808307.pdf


Edit: How could I forget? BBC R&D is a treasure.. http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/index.shtml - here's an excellent book on acoustics: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/...tural-acoustics/bbc_guideacousticpractice.pdf

And this one is not directly related, but it's utterly amazing in scope and depth: http://www.falstad.com/mathphysics.html - java applets visualizing just about anything!
 
Last edited:
Apr 3, 2010
16,022
0
0
Seattle, WA
#5
Thanks Bruce and Nordenstam.

Kal, I am maintaining the head thread as the achieve of all the suggestions. Time permitting, I will work on refining the short description and heading they should go into.
 

garylkoh

WBF Technical Expert (Speakers & Audio Equipment)
#6
Amir, I don't know if the ear and brain constitutes technology - but your topic says human hearing system, and in order to understand acoustics completely, we need to know how we hear, and how we perceive sound. So, here's my contribution.

The structure of the ear - Promenade 'Round the Cochlea:
http://www.cochlea.org/

How the Ear Works - Nature's Solutions for Listening:
http://www.bcm.edu/oto/index.cfm?pmid=15095

Standard passive models of the ear do not account for the phenomenal sensitivity and selectivity of human hearing. The most compelling hypothesis has been the Cochlear Amplifier. However, at this time, all the details of how this amplification can be achieved is still not known. A fairly exhaustive review paper as of 2001 on how the cochlea works is available here:
http://cbt.beckman.uiuc.edu/papers_spring06/raven.pdf

Prof David Kemp discovered Otoacoustic Emissions in 1977 - today, it is primarily used for early detection of hearing loss and most of the studies revolve around hearing loss because of the profitability of selling hearing aids. We are still learning about its complexity, and how it enhances the hearing ability - especially in the presence of masking noise.
http://www.est-med.com/OAE/understanding-using_OAE von Kemp.pdf

Psychoacoustics, Neuro-audiology, and Evolutionary Psychology:
I know that they have been recommended elsewhere, but these two books are essential reading to understanding our obsessions.
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain - Oliver Sacks
http://www.amazon.com/Musicophilia-Tales-Music-Revised-Expanded/dp/1400033535/ref=pd_sim_b_4
This is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession - Daniel J. Levitin
http://www.amazon.com/This-Your-Brain-Music-Obsession/dp/0452288525/ref=pd_sim_b_4

What we audiophiles "know" but research is still ongoing in scientific circles:

Imaging (spatial localization) and Soundstage (auditory scene analysis) -
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~robust/Papers/SternWangBrownChapter.pdf

PRaT (perception of rhythm) and Foot tapping (beat induction) -
Rhythm and Beat Perception in Motor Areas of the brain: http://www.brainmusic.org/EducationalActivitiesFolder/Grahn_rhythm2007.pdf

Contribution of Anthropometric Factors to Individual Differences in Perception of Rhythm: https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/1811/24478/1/EMR000021a-Todd-etal.pdf
 

Kal Rubinson

Active Member
May 5, 2010
1,437
0
36
NYC/CT
www.stereophile.com
#9
Cannot cut/paste into the first post but I'd like to add:
Sound Reproduction: The Acoustics and Psychoacoustics of Loudspeakers and Rooms By Floyd Toole. Focal Press, 2008.
Detection Threshold for tones above 22 kHz by Kaoru, A. and Shogo, K. AES Convention Paper 5401, 2001.
 
Apr 3, 2010
16,022
0
0
Seattle, WA
#11
A rant. The world would surely be better off if AES did not lock up these contributions behind its doors, asking for money. They did not pay to have any of these papers written. They should provide copies for free.
 

garylkoh

WBF Technical Expert (Speakers & Audio Equipment)
#12
Thanks Kal. I couldn't find a copy of "Detection Threshold for Tones above 22kHz" to download but I did find out that the paper is by Kaoru Ashihara and Shogo Kiryu and was delivered in Japanese. Is the paper on the AES website in English? I don't want to pay my $20 and get a Japanese paper.

Here's another AES paper that might be a follow-up:
Perceptual Discrimination of Very High Frequency Components in Musical Sound Recorded with a Newly Developed Wide Frequency Range Microphone by K. Hamasaki, T. Nishiguchi and A. Ando, AES 2004.
http://www.nhk.or.jp/strl/publica/labnote/lab486.html

Again, no conclusion - just "it might be worth recording music by high resolution audio systems with very wide frequency range, because the possibility that such very high frequency band might affect human perception cannot be entirely discounted."
 

garylkoh

WBF Technical Expert (Speakers & Audio Equipment)
#14
Another interesting paper - published in the Journal of the European Acoustics Association 2008. The finding that temporal resolution of the human auditory system to be three times shorter than found in past investigations. Thus, while an ultrasonic pure tone might not be audible in itself, the study seems to find that the ear might be sensitive when it is present as a harmonic to an audible frequency.

http://www.physics.sc.edu/kunchur/temporal.pdf

The author even takes a poke at us
It is also commonly conjectured in the audio literature that the time-domain response of a system (e.g., temporal smearing caused by capacitive and other energy-storage mechanisms in cables) is a key factor in determining the transparency of reproduction (see, for example, van Maanen, 1993). However a search of the literature revealed an absence of a controlled blind experiment comparable to the one conducted here. The present work thus contributes toward a better fundamental understanding and provides a quantitative measure for audio-reproduction standards.
Emphasis mine - may be he intends to measure the audibility of cable next :D
 
Dec 13, 2010
253
1
18
#16
Here are some more



Fazenda et al., “Perception of low frequencies in small rooms", Proceedings of the European Acoustics Symposium, September 2004, Guimaraes, Portugal
http://www.sea-acustica.es/Guimaraes04/ID45.pdf

Goldberg, “Finding the audibility of the temporal decay rate of a low frequency room mode” (2005)
http://www.acoustics.hut.fi/asf/publicat/akup05/goldberg.pdf


Linkwitz, "Room Reflections Misunderstood", Audio Eng. Soc. preprint 7162
http://www.linkwitzlab.com/AES'07/AES123-final2.pdf


Merimaa, “Analysis, synthesis and perception of spatial sound – binaural localization modelling and multichannel loudspeaker reproduction”, Dissertation Helsinki University of Technology, 2006
http://lib.tkk.fi/Diss/2006/isbn9512282917/isbn9512282917.pdf

Rubak, “Coloration in room impulse response”, Joint Balti-Nordic Acoustics Meeting 2004, 8-10 June, Mariehamn, Åland
http://www.acoustics.hut.fi/asf/bnam04/webprosari/papers/o23.pdf

Spring et al., “The measurement of sound diffusion index in small rooms”, BBC RD 1969/16
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1969-16.pdf

Taylor, “A preliminary study of the influence of room mode structure on sound absorption”, BBC RD 1983/4
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1983-04.pdf

Taylor, “Room modes and sound measurement: some practical measurements compared with theoretical predictions”, BBC RD 1985/11
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1985-11.pdf

Toole, “Loudspeakers and rooms for sound reproduction – a scientific review”, J. of the Audio Engineering Society 2006, p.451
http://www.harman.com/EN-US/OurComp...p/Documents/Scientific Publications/13686.pdf

Voetmann, “50 years of sound control room design”
http://www.madebydelta.com/imported/images/DELTA_Web/documents/TC/acoustics/av126205.pdf

Walker, “A preliminary investigation into the measurement of time and frequency response of listening rooms and control cubicles”, BBC RD 1979/9
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1979-09.pdf

Walker, “Low-frequency room responses: Part 1 -- Background and qualitative considerations, “BBC RD 1992/8
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1992-08.pdf

Walker, “Low-frequency room responses: Part 2 -- Calculation methods and experimental results”, BBC RD 1992/9
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1992-09.pdf

Walker, “High frequency room responses: Acoustic design and the control of stereophonic image quality”, BBC RD 1994/11
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1994-11.pdf

Walker, “CONTROLLED IMAGE DESIGN: The measurement of Time-Frequency responses”, BBC RD 1995/3
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-03.pdf

Walker, “Controlled Image Design: The management of stereophonic image quality”, BBC RD 1995/4
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-04.pdf

Walker, “Controlled Image Designs: Results from the first installations”, BBC RD 1995/5
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1995-05.pdf


Psychoacoustics

Litovsky et al., “The precedence effect”, J. of Acoust. Soc. of America, vol. 106, 1999, p.1633
http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/~litovsky/papers/1999-3.pdf

Salomons, “Coloration and binaural decoloration of sound due to reflections”, Thesis, Delft University 1995
http://repository.tudelft.nl/assets...7f-8d2a-eb5d6cc04fbf/as_salomons_19951220.PDF


Ultrasonic hearing and Hypersonic effect

Ashihara et al., “Detection threshold for tones about 22 kHz”, 110th AES convention 2001, preprint no. 5401

Ashihara “Hearing thresholds for pure tones above 16 kHz”, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 2007, Volume 122, Issue 3, pp. EL52-EL57

D. Griesinger, “Perception of mid frequency and high frequency intermodulation distortion in loudspeakers and its relationship to high-definition audio”, 24th International AES Conference 2003, Banff, Canada
www.davidgriesinger.com/intermod.ppt

Hamasaki et al., “Perceptual Discrimination of Very High Frequency Components in Musical Sound Recorded with a Newly Developed Wide Frequency Range Microphone”, 117th AES convention 2004, preprint no. 6298

Hosoi et al., “Activation of the auditory cortex by ultrasound”, The Lancet, vol. 351, Febr. 14, 1998, p.496

Ishiuchi et al., “Difference tone produced by two ultrasonic components”, Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Biotelemetry, Sep 1990, Yokohama, Japan

Lenhardt, “Ultrasonic hearing in humans: applications for tinnitus treatment”, Int. Tinnitus J., vol.9, no.2, pp.69-75 (2003)

Lenhardt, “Eyes as fenestrations to the ears: a novel mechanism for high-frequency and ultrasound hearing”, Int. Tinnitus J., vol.13, no.1, pp.3-10 (2007)

Nakamura et al., “Analysis of music-brain interaction with simultaneous measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and electroencephalogram beta rhythm in human subjects”, Neuroscience Letters 275 (1999), p.222-226

Nishiguchi et al., “Perceptual discrimination between music sounds with and without very high frequency components”, 115th AES convention 2003, preprint no. 5876

Nishiguchi et al., „Perceptual discrimination of very high frequency components in wide frequency range musical sound“, Applied Acoustics 2009, vol. 70, p.921

Nishimura et al., “Ultrasonic masker clarifies ultrasonic perception in man”, Hearing Research 2003, Volume 175, pp.171-177

Omata et al., “A psychoacoustic measurement and ABR for the sound signals in the frequency range between 10 kHz and 24 kHz”, 125th Audio Engineering Society convention 2008, preprint no. 7566

Oohashi et al., “High frequency sound above the audible range affects brain electric activity and sound perception”, 91st AES convention 1991, preprint no. 3207

Oohashi et al., “Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect”, Journal of Neurophysiology 83 (2000), p. 3548-3558
http://www.linearaudio.nl/Documents/high freq inpact on brain.pdf

Oohashi et al., “Multidisciplinary study on the hypersonic effect”, International Congress Series 1226 (2002), pp.27-42

Oohashi et al., “The role of biological systems other than auditory air-conduction in the emergence of the hypersonic effect”, Brain Research 1073-1074 (2006), p. 339-347

Sugimoto et al, “Human perception model for ultrasonic difference tones”, Proceedings of the 24th IASTED International Conference, Feb 16-18, 2005, Innsbruck, Austria

Yagi et al., “Auditory display for deep brain activation: hypersonic effect”,
Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Auditory Display, Kyoto, Japan, July 2-5, 2002
http://www.icad.org/websiteV2.0/Conferences/ICAD2002/proceedings/Oohashi.pdf

Yagi et al., “Modulatory effect of inaudible high-frequency sounds on human acoustic perception”, Neuroscience Letters 351 (2003), p.191-195


A rant. The world would surely be better off if AES did not lock up these contributions behind its doors, asking for money. They did not pay to have any of these papers written. They should provide copies for free.
FYI, I have made a list of papers relating to small room acoustics and related psychoacoustics which is posted here:

http://www.hifi-forum.de/viewthread-72-2045.html

I’ve got all those papers as pdf, so anyone who is interested…


Klaus
 

garylkoh

WBF Technical Expert (Speakers & Audio Equipment)
#20
Thanks, Amir. This is a great paper.

What is interesting is not so much that the CD-standard loop is not audible, it is their assertion that virtually all SACDs & DVD-A's sound better than CDs, and this they attribute to the producers and engineers being given the freedom to product recordings that sound as good as they can make them, without having to commercialize them. I recall this same sentiment from Bruce B sometime ago - his customers wanted him to make recordings that sound good on cheap stereos.
 

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