Charles Krauthammer, MD may he RIP

jazdoc

Member Sponsor
Aug 7, 2010
2,765
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Bellevue
#81
The bold above is an approach I also value greatly which, IMO, is part of the foundation of the Socratic Method----an approach to decision making I find highly correlated to civility. One must consider all side of an arguement equally in order to become enlightened. Only the enlightened can coexist in harmony.

“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion... Nor is it enough that he should hear the opinions of adversaries from his own teachers, presented as they state them, and accompanied by what they offer as refutations. He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them...he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.” J.S. Mill
 

Priaptor

Member Sponsor
Jan 29, 2012
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#82
The opening line of the WSJ obit is:

Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning conservative columnist whose critiques made him an influential voice in Washington for decades, died Thursday. He was 68 years old.

It's important in the environment of fake news and pundits pretending to be factual journalists that we point out who has an agenda. The fact that Priaptor thinks that simply posting a obit from the Washington Post (a paper where Krauthammer wrote) is in itself controversial shows how powerful and effective the campaign against factual reporting has been. Sad times indeed.
No you are distorting what I said. It was you, in the same post, who compared him to Rachel Maddow. It was you, who chose to define the obit from WaPo by one of Dr. K's controversial positions which I list above. I did no such thing as you claim.
 

PeterA

Well-Known Member
Dec 7, 2011
5,633
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North Shore of Boston
#83
Whether true or not, I have the impression that Krauthammer listened to other's opinions. He was smart, he did his research, he listened, and then he presented his view on a subject. He did all this while remaining calm, respectful and civil. We need more people like him in the public arena to lead by example how one should behave.
 

Priaptor

Member Sponsor
Jan 29, 2012
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#84
Whether true or not, I have the impression that Krauthammer listened to other's opinions. He was smart, he did his research, he listened, and then he presented his view on a subject. He did all this while remaining calm, respectful and civil. We need more people like him in the public arena to lead by example how one should behave.
Couldn't agree more.
 
Feb 8, 2011
21,948
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Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#85
I think the lesson is that it starts at the core. If someone exhibits integrity and honesty then their opinions should be listened to even if one doesn't agree. But the minute someone shows themselves to lack those qualities then their opinions cannot be trusted since they are likely being used to achieve personal gains and power. JMO, of course.

I have been reading and listening to a lot of what CK had to say over the years. His positions were never consistently aligned with one group. They spanned the gamut of ideologies.
+1
 

treitz3

Super Moderator
#86
Thanks gentlemen for making this thread more cordial. It is appreciated.

Tom
 
Feb 8, 2011
21,948
606
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Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#87
Whether true or not, I have the impression that Krauthammer listened to other's opinions. He was smart, he did his research, he listened, and then he presented his view on a subject. He did all this while remaining calm, respectful and civil. We need more people like him in the public arena to lead by example how one should behave.
+1
 
Feb 8, 2011
21,948
606
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Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#88
Study the man, learn more, learn to appreciate who he was, who he is.
Perfect he is not, nobody is. Humans are not perfect creatures in nature.
Aspiration to and action towards the best of humanity and the planet is the quest.
 
Oct 30, 2017
499
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USA
#89
“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion... Nor is it enough that he should hear the opinions of adversaries from his own teachers, presented as they state them, and accompanied by what they offer as refutations. He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them...he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.” J.S. Mill
Ya JS had it goin on.
 

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 25, 2015
6,675
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#90
Whether true or not, I have the impression that Krauthammer listened to other's opinions. He was smart, he did his research, he listened, and then he presented his view on a subject. He did all this while remaining calm, respectful and civil. We need more people like him in the public arena to lead by example how one should behave.
+1
 

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
1,354
250
83
Far Hills, NJ
#91
I'm late to this thread, but not late in my admiration for Charles Krauthammer. More than any other commentator/pundit/columnist, I reserved my greatest anticipation for his commentary whenever he was on any broadcast. "What does Krauthammer have to say? is all I cared about hearing. And for the most part, it was true. He was, along with other select voices such as Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, the most important and thoughtful conservative thinker of our time. I find it interesting that like Kristol (father of neoconservativism) and Podhoretz (founder of Commentary Magazine), he grew up decidedly liberal (he was a speech writer for Mondale) and became a conservative later in life, as did I. Perhaps that's why I found him so endearing and important to my own edification. If you have the opportunity to view "In his own words", a 1 hour special about him recently broadcast on TV, I would highly encourage it. Now that he's gone, I will try and hold him a bit closer thus summer by reading his book "Things that matter", a series of writings written over 3 decades. As I felt when listening to him, my hope is that I will be richer and wiser for reading his essays. Erudition, intellect and wit is generally a winning combination. In Krauthammer's hands, it should be a wonderful read.
 
Jan 29, 2012
1,318
404
83
#92
Whether true or not, I have the impression that Krauthammer listened to other's opinions. He was smart, he did his research, he listened, and then he presented his view on a subject. He did all this while remaining calm, respectful and civil. We need more people like him in the public arena to lead by example how one should behave.
Agreed Peter. Much like George Will, he was a person of integrity and had an open mind.
 
Feb 8, 2011
21,948
606
113
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#93
I'm late to this thread, but not late in my admiration for Charles Krauthammer. More than any other commentator/pundit/columnist, I reserved my greatest anticipation for his commentary whenever he was on any broadcast. "What does Krauthammer have to say? is all I cared about hearing. And for the most part, it was true. He was, along with other select voices such as Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, the most important and thoughtful conservative thinker of our time. I find it interesting that like Kristol (father of neoconservativism) and Podhoretz (founder of Commentary Magazine), he grew up decidedly liberal (he was a speech writer for Mondale) and became a conservative later in life, as did I. Perhaps that's why I found him so endearing and important to my own edification. If you have the opportunity to view "In his own words", a 1 hour special about him recently broadcast on TV, I would highly encourage it. Now that he's gone, I will try and hold him a bit closer thus summer by reading his book "Things that matter", a series of writings written over 3 decades. As I felt when listening to him, my hope is that I will be richer and wiser for reading his essays. Erudition, intellect and wit is generally a winning combination. In Krauthammer's hands, it should be a wonderful read.
+1
 

Priaptor

Member Sponsor
Jan 29, 2012
929
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FL
#94
I'm late to this thread, but not late in my admiration for Charles Krauthammer. More than any other commentator/pundit/columnist, I reserved my greatest anticipation for his commentary whenever he was on any broadcast. "What does Krauthammer have to say? is all I cared about hearing. And for the most part, it was true. He was, along with other select voices such as Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, the most important and thoughtful conservative thinker of our time. I find it interesting that like Kristol (father of neoconservativism) and Podhoretz (founder of Commentary Magazine), he grew up decidedly liberal (he was a speech writer for Mondale) and became a conservative later in life, as did I. Perhaps that's why I found him so endearing and important to my own edification. If you have the opportunity to view "In his own words", a 1 hour special about him recently broadcast on TV, I would highly encourage it. Now that he's gone, I will try and hold him a bit closer thus summer by reading his book "Things that matter", a series of writings written over 3 decades. As I felt when listening to him, my hope is that I will be richer and wiser for reading his essays. Erudition, intellect and wit is generally a winning combination. In Krauthammer's hands, it should be a wonderful read.
Excellent post and a great read. You will enjoy it.
 

treitz3

Super Moderator
#95
I have read somewhere (no reference) that he was considered the "Dean" of conservative commentary. To be even considered in that kind of territory is......I have also heard someone say that whenever he spoke, no one interrupted him. When I think back on that? It's profound because *most* everybody in today's world is rude, interrupts and isn't respected. He was.

Think about that for a second.

Tom
 

edorr

WBF Founding Member
May 11, 2010
3,146
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Smyrna, GA
#96
Very smart guy. Really liked him. High integrity. To his credit he was appalled by Trumpism (like George Will). I suspect he would be equally appalled by Fox turning into a Trump propaganda outlet. May he RIP. Full disclose, I'm a lefty.
 

Priaptor

Member Sponsor
Jan 29, 2012
929
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FL
#97
Very smart guy. Really liked him. High integrity. To his credit he was appalled by Trumpism (like George Will). I suspect he would be equally appalled by Fox turning into a Trump propaganda outlet. May he RIP. Full disclose, I'm a lefty.
Lol

Thanks for being honest and still being able to praise the guy.
 

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