Speaker decoupling options

moby2004

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2018
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113
Hi all,

I am trying to identify the different ways to decouple my speakers from the floor ( I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source ) .
Right now, my speakers ( YG Sonja 2.2) are coupled with standard spikes/discs and it’s probably not the best for this environment…

Based on my readings with positive feedbacks, I can think of:
1) decoupling discs. Probably better than standard discs but will it really make a noticeable difference?
2) GAIA footers from Isoacoustics. Read many good reviews and had some beforehand ( for a different speaker) but the initial fitting was painful and moving the speakers with them was quite a challenge….
3) CMS ( goes beyond decoupling ) but seems not compatible with my speakers.
4) speaker platforms : Symposium Svelte +, Townshend, EVPs, probably missing many other brands ?
Any other products that I may have missed ?
Any preferred solution(s)?

Thanks
Alex
 

Golum

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Jun 7, 2018
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I'm looking myself into these:
Not really hyped here but they do seem done phenomenally

Also their other products seem topnotch
 
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ddk

Industry Expert
May 19, 2013
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Hi all,

I am trying to identify the different ways to decouple my speakers from the floor ( I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source ) .
Right now, my speakers ( YG Sonja 2.2) are coupled with standard spikes/discs and it’s probably not the best for this environment…

Based on my readings with positive feedbacks, I can think of:
1) decoupling discs. Probably better than standard discs but will it really make a noticeable difference?
2) GAIA footers from Isoacoustics. Read many good reviews and had some beforehand ( for a different speaker) but the initial fitting was painful and moving the speakers with them was quite a challenge….
3) CMS ( goes beyond decoupling ) but seems not compatible with my speakers.
4) speaker platforms : Symposium Svelte +, Townshend, EVPs, probably missing many other brands ?
Any other products that I may have missed ?
Any preferred solution(s)?

Thanks
Alex
Avoid platforms as they introduce their own coloration, bass issues and can't "decouple" whatever that means when everything will interact and bounce off the floor. What you really need to do is deal with floor reflections with a rug, try with your speakers on the rug and if you prefer the tiled floor buy a couple of mouse pads cut them up into smaller squares and put them under the discs if they're not lined with rubber. You don't need to spend thousands on chachkis.

david
 

spiritofmusic

Well-Known Member
Jun 13, 2013
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I've been running Arya Audio Revopods w great results. Beat stock spikes, Symposium Acoustics Rollerblocks and Iso Acoustics Gaias in my system pretty consistently.
 

tvad

Member
Aug 22, 2021
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There's a lot of discussion about this recently.

The recent post-count winner, depending on where you look, is Townshend Audio podiums .

If you're in the USA, then I'd suggest staring with some options that are easy to return: A/V RoomService EVP, Gaia footers, Symposium products, etc.

Once you've tried one or more of those, if you're still not satisfied, then buy a pair of Townshend podiums. Since they ship from England and weigh a fair amount, returning them is expensive.
 
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DaveC

Industry Expert
Nov 16, 2014
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I think it's very important to decouple the speaker from the floor and am very surprised at how little speaker manufacturers do to address this issue. They spend massive amounts to address the vibration of the cabinets themselves but take no regard for the fact the speaker cabinet will transfer energy into the floor.

Ideally you'd want isolation that attenuates vibration without any sharp deviation in how much it attenuates different frequencies. Another consideration is any changes the product makes to the height of the speaker, especially if the speaker has bass drivers or ports anywhere near the floor, these must be designed with the floor in mind and if you change the distance from the driver or port to the floor you will change the bass response.

Speaker isolation can make for large differences/improvements in subjective sound quality and can reduce excitation of windows, picture frames, lighting fixtures, etc. as well as prevent transmission of bass frequencies through floors and walls.

Isoacoustics seem like a good and sensible solution but the Gaia footers are an expensive implementation intended for audiophile market and they require the speaker to be raised much more than you might want as the Sonjas are already tall. They are basically a steel tube with rubber sockets on either end. I like the simplicity and the reasonable price of the industrial models.

I haven't experienced Townshend but I've seen their product, vids and measurements and I like the design. They won't raise your speakers much either. These seem like the best bet for your situation, IMO.
 

tvad

Member
Aug 22, 2021
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I haven't experienced Townshend but I've seen their product, vids and measurements and I like the design. They won't raise your speakers much either. These seem like the best bet for your situation, IMO.
@DaveC makes a good point about loudspeaker height, and Townshend podiums do allow the speakers to rest close to the floor.

I have owned Townshend podiums.
 

moby2004

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2018
156
144
113
Thanks all for your answers.
The provided spikes are around 5cm high so as long as the new footers/platforms are close to this height, I should be “fine”.
I have contacted both Townshend Audio and A/V Room service but as I am living in HK ,I won’t be able to use the return policy I believe.
I will have a look at Hifistay catalogue. Seems pretty complete in terms of solutions indeed and there’s a local dealer…
I am keeping Isoacoustics as a “on-hold” solution for the time being because of my relatively poor first experience in terms of practicality only. ( not in terms of efficiency) but maybe they did progress on that front with their heavy speakers models.

Alex
 

treitz3

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Dec 25, 2011
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"I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source"

Would you be so kind as to describe this issue in more detail?

Tom
 

moby2004

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2018
156
144
113
"I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source"

Would you be so kind as to describe this issue in more detail?

Tom

I was feeling some kind of resonance and “smears”. I could feel low frequency pressure from the floor ( I don’t know if this is impacting the flat downstairs as well as “luckily” for me it’s empty). In my previous flat, I never had this sensation. I have big rugs between and in front of the speakers but not under them. Anyway, I am not too sure rugs can do anything for this issue.
I moved my speakers to see if it helps but no massive difference.
I admit I didn’t do any kind of measurements and I can’t move my speakers too much so long story short I asked myself if decoupling the speakers would help. It seems it will but I will have to test it by myself.
I will probably start by putting kind of sorbothane under the discs just to see if it helps regarding that particular issue and only that particular issue .(as it might have side effects however )
 

rDin

Active Member
Oct 28, 2019
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I'm using Townshend Podiums under Martin Logan Montis in my room with a wooden floor. The difference is night and day. With the speakers sat on the floor the floor "sings" in sympathy, completely colouring the sound. On the podiums, that effect is removed entirely and the sound is so much cleaner, open and transparent. Measuring vibrations is interesting: so much vibration getting into my racks and equipment from the floor previously is substantially attenuated, showing the podiums do a great job of isolating the speakers from the floor. And removing all that vibration from the rack/gear has to be a good thing.

Downsides: there's an immediate sense of a loss of bass, because the floor is no longer contributing. But in fact, once you adjust to the sound, you realise that you are getting clean bass, not coloured. However, I also found a need to increase overall volume to get it back to where I like it, so even though the floor was colouring the sound it was clearly contributing to my required listening volume.

Biggest issue is that there are some bass frequencies which seem to resonate with the podium support springs and so you can hear them "buzzing" from time to time. In my system I use a sub and roll off the main speakers, which goes a long way to resolving this issue, but not entirely. So now it's a rarity, but not entirely solved.

I cannot imagine not using something like the podiums moving forward: decoupling transforms the sound in a very positive way.
 
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Cellcbern

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Jul 31, 2015
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Hi all,

I am trying to identify the different ways to decouple my speakers from the floor ( I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source ) .
Right now, my speakers ( YG Sonja 2.2) are coupled with standard spikes/discs and it’s probably not the best for this environment…

Based on my readings with positive feedbacks, I can think of:
1) decoupling discs. Probably better than standard discs but will it really make a noticeable difference?
2) GAIA footers from Isoacoustics. Read many good reviews and had some beforehand ( for a different speaker) but the initial fitting was painful and moving the speakers with them was quite a challenge….
3) CMS ( goes beyond decoupling ) but seems not compatible with my speakers.
4) speaker platforms : Symposium Svelte +, Townshend, EVPs, probably missing many other brands ?
Any other products that I may have missed ?
Any preferred solution(s)?

Thanks
Alex
I use Corian boards with heavy duty adhesive felt pads on the bottom between the Gaia footers and the floor. The rubber side of the Gaia feet sticks to the Corian allowing me to easily slide the speakers wherever I want to. The Gaias are attached to Soundocity outriggers and tightened from above with twist knobs so I don't have to bother with the locking nut that would normally contact the bottom of the speaker - much easier. With my 37" tall speakers cabinets the small increase in height has not had any negative IMG_0372.jpg audible impact. When I upgrade it will be to the Townshends.
 
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dubselect

New Member
Aug 29, 2021
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Decoupling speakers from the floor is the key point to improve the sound quality of any audio system. I would recommend to create an improvised sandwich by using two different devices - two sets of absorbers/couplers and a pair of isolation platforms.

You can choose both from one brand if you want, for example, Symposium. They manufacture absorbers (Rollerblocks) and isolation platforms (Sveltes). Peter Bizlewicz, the owner of Symposium Acoustics brand, recommends to use them in the following manner: place isolation platforms right under speakers and then put the platforms onto a set of three Rollerblocks.

I experienced such an approach and can confirm that it works like magic. I placed my bookshelf speakers onto Auralex ProPad platforms. Each of the two ProPads is in turn placed on three Rollerblock Series 2 double stacked absorbers with Superballs.
I also replaced stock spikes of speaker stands with Finite Elemente Ceparucs, but it does not really matter in case of floorstanding speakers.

There are many interesting solutions for decoupling speakers from the floor. But using isolation platforms in conjunction with absorbers seems to be one of the most effective ways of taming vibrations.
DSC04518.JPG
 

Addicted to hifi

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Sep 8, 2020
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Decoupling speakers from the floor is the key point to improve the sound quality of any audio system. I would recommend to create an improvised sandwich by using two different devices - two sets of absorbers/couplers and a pair of isolation platforms.

You can choose both from one brand if you want, for example, Symposium. They manufacture absorbers (Rollerblocks) and isolation platforms (Sveltes). Peter Bizlewicz, the owner of Symposium Acoustics brand, recommends to use them in the following manner: place isolation platforms right under speakers and then put the platforms onto a set of three Rollerblocks.

I experienced such an approach and can confirm that it works like magic. I placed my bookshelf speakers onto Auralex ProPad platforms. Each of the two ProPads is in turn placed on three Rollerblock Series 2 double stacked absorbers with Superballs.
I also replaced stock spikes of speaker stands with Finite Elemente Ceparucs, but it does not really matter in case of floorstanding speakers.

There are many interesting solutions for decoupling speakers from the floor. But using isolation platforms in conjunction with absorbers seems to be one of the most effective ways of taming vibrations.
View attachment 81590
Welcome to wbf dubselect.
 

stehno

Well-Known Member
Jul 5, 2014
1,156
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Salem, OR
From numerous posts above (including some experts), the overwhelming consensus seems to be that redirecting unwanted energy from the speaker to the floor is pure evil.

Can anybody here articulate why?
 

moby2004

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2018
156
144
113
Decoupling speakers from the floor is the key point to improve the sound quality of any audio system. I would recommend to create an improvised sandwich by using two different devices - two sets of absorbers/couplers and a pair of isolation platforms.

You can choose both from one brand if you want, for example, Symposium. They manufacture absorbers (Rollerblocks) and isolation platforms (Sveltes). Peter Bizlewicz, the owner of Symposium Acoustics brand, recommends to use them in the following manner: place isolation platforms right under speakers and then put the platforms onto a set of three Rollerblocks.

I experienced such an approach and can confirm that it works like magic. I placed my bookshelf speakers onto Auralex ProPad platforms. Each of the two ProPads is in turn placed on three Rollerblock Series 2 double stacked absorbers with Superballs.
I also replaced stock spikes of speaker stands with Finite Elemente Ceparucs, but it does not really matter in case of floorstanding speakers.

There are many interesting solutions for decoupling speakers from the floor. But using isolation platforms in conjunction with absorbers seems to be one of the most effective ways of taming vibrations.
View attachment 81590

I am ordering a couple of options. Will receive them next week. Let’s see…
 

Hear Here

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Feb 14, 2020
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Portsmouth, UK
Hi all,

I am trying to identify the different ways to decouple my speakers from the floor ( I moved into a new flat and the floor is very different: tiles of “poor” quality, relatively bouncy floor. I am renting so I can’t fix the problem at the source ) .
Right now, my speakers ( YG Sonja 2.2) are coupled with standard spikes/discs and it’s probably not the best for this environment…

Based on my readings with positive feedbacks, I can think of:
1) decoupling discs. Probably better than standard discs but will it really make a noticeable difference?
2) GAIA footers from Isoacoustics. Read many good reviews and had some beforehand ( for a different speaker) but the initial fitting was painful and moving the speakers with them was quite a challenge….
3) CMS ( goes beyond decoupling ) but seems not compatible with my speakers.
4) speaker platforms : Symposium Svelte +, Townshend, EVPs, probably missing many other brands ?
Any other products that I may have missed ?
Any preferred solution(s)?

Thanks
Alex

Moby - You list Gaias amongst your options but no one has followed this up!.

I use Gaia Is on my heavy speakers and I find they offer a big sound improvement. The bass drops a bit in volume but dramatically improves in detail. Most systems will allow for a simple increase in bass level if you really need this, but you'll appreciate the quality improvement. Regarding fixing Gaias to your speakers, my advice is not to use the fiddly supplied nuts but to use spring "wavy" waskers or neoprene ones so you can tighten the Gaias against an increasing load and stop when the logo is facing forwards (or backwards) as recomended. Your downstairs neighbours will be pleased when you ditch the spikes too! Peter
 
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