My Bucket List System

Leif S

Industry Expert
Feb 14, 2015
765
153
255
California
www.vonschweikert.com
After what was supposed to be 15-20 minute system sound update that lasted 2 hours, I no longer just love the VAC Statement 450StereoiQ, now it is making me horney. Getting better in every way every day.
:eek:
 

mullard88

Well-Known Member
Jun 5, 2010
923
44
478
I'm very very happy for you Mobiusman. I have a pair of E3 in my bedroom. I think it is one of the best values in speakers. From the day I installed it, I still have not felt the urge to rotate another speaker into its place. Perhaps when my stacked Quads should die of old age, I will purchase an E5 or a small VSA Ultra series speaker.
 

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
Sam

you need to replace it with the E5 Mk ll and do I understand there will be an Ultra version as well?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Leif S

Leif S

Industry Expert
Feb 14, 2015
765
153
255
California
www.vonschweikert.com

mullard88

Well-Known Member
Jun 5, 2010
923
44
478
Steve,

I don't know what series the E5 will be in by the time my Quads stop playing. I played them 7 hours straight yesterday and 10 hours straight today. They are still in excellent health.

I am just very impressed with the E3 that I would consider an E5 as a replacement for my Quads when they can no longer serve. I followed the set up instructions Leif gave me the last time he visited and I believe the resolution of my bedroom system has really improved. There is a live recording where one can hear furniture moved under the stage that I can now also hear in my bedroom system.
 

mullard88

Well-Known Member
Jun 5, 2010
923
44
478
Leif,

It's nice to know that you are developing an even smaller Ultra speaker.

Thank you for the extra advise you gave me on setting up the E3. We had too much cake the last time you visited. Next time, I will buy less and smaller cakes so that I can invite you to dinner.

Let me know when you will be here or in Bangkok again. I look forward to seeing you again.

I would also love to hear your home set up the next time I visit southern California.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Leif S

Leif S

Industry Expert
Feb 14, 2015
765
153
255
California
www.vonschweikert.com
Leif,

It's nice to know that you are developing an even smaller Ultra speaker.

Thank you for the extra advise you gave me on setting up the E3. We had too much cake the last time you visited. Next time, I will buy less and smaller cakes so that I can invite you to dinner.

Let me know when you will be here or in Bangkok again. I look forward to seeing you again.

I would also love to hear your home set up the next time I visit southern California.
Hi Sam,
It looks like I will be there in November for the audio show and looking forward to it. We will have the new Endeavor Special Edition, the E-5mKII, and the Uni 2mKIII. Should be a lot of fun.

I'm hoping to replace my E5 at my house with the new ULTRA 5 if that is what we decide to call it. But I will still have the E5s at my house and we can rotate them in. Let me know when you will be in the States again.
 

JackD201

WBF Founding Member
Apr 21, 2010
11,806
828
700
Manila, Philippines
As Lionel Ritchie sang, "Ooooo We're gonna hava a party!" There an 80's pop reference for you Leif! LOL

Hey Russ, good for you my friend. I feel I've finally reached the point where I am really satisfied. The U11s can do exactly what I want them to for the space that I have. While I don't want to be kicking any buckets soon, this speaker has got a big check right beside it on my list. I'm really happy for you and Rodney for taking the plunge. These are not easy decisions to make for anybody. I'm especially happy that you are getting the pay off this early on. If your experience will mirror mine, all I can tell you is that, man, it'll just keep getting better. :)
 

Mobiusman

Well-Known Member
May 25, 2010
640
299
535
Jersey Shore- waterside
As Lionel Ritchie sang, "Ooooo We're gonna hava a party!" There an 80's pop reference for you Leif! LOL

Hey Russ, good for you my friend. I feel I've finally reached the point where I am really satisfied. The U11s can do exactly what I want them to for the space that I have. While I don't want to be kicking any buckets soon, this speaker has got a big check right beside it on my list. I'm really happy for you and Rodney for taking the plunge. These are not easy decisions to make for anybody. I'm especially happy that you are getting the pay off this early on. If your experience will mirror mine, all I can tell you is that, man, it'll just keep getting better. :)
Jack,

Thank you for the comment. You read my mind. I am very lucky that the way I got to where I am today was not planned, but is making the progressive experience of my dream system becoming a reality with new pieces arriving weekly and at times almost daily. It is no doubt about as close as I will ever get to an audio Christmas/Hanukkah were I am the giver, but feel like the priviledged recipient because it is exactly what I wanted, AND it feels like a gift since it is already totally paid for. And my biggest gifts have not been openned yet or have not arrived. Arrived and on deck are MSB Reference DAC with a Fempto 77 clock, an Innous Zenith SE server, and my 700 pound marble isolation table to support my yet to be delivered Bergmann Galder and Odin arm, which will hold my essentially new ZYX Ultimate Optimum cartridge, which I put back in its box when I decided my interim turntable and Rockport air bearing arm were not worthy of the cartridge. AND of course the small pieces like a full loom of MasterBuilt Ultra cables, speaker wire and PC's for everything.

Plus the addition of each piece individually is helping me better appreciate each piece's contribution. And then, experience tells me that a system of this caliber will sound better than the sum of its parts once totally assembled and tuned. That it already sounds equal, if not better than any of the VSA, VAC, MB, TAC megasystem I have heard at shows, and I am currently running it through E3 Mk2's tells me to act like like a child and not anticipate the next gift.
 

Mobiusman

Well-Known Member
May 25, 2010
640
299
535
Jersey Shore- waterside
First let me clarify my previous comment about my current stage of build of my bucket system was making me horney because it sounds so good. I did not mean it literally, but rather to mean that the feeling it was and still is producing in me is a feeling of ecstasey that I associate with amongst other exteremly pleasureable things ultimate sexual pleasure. I should have chosen my words better.
 

Mobiusman

Well-Known Member
May 25, 2010
640
299
535
Jersey Shore- waterside
A Bucket List By-Product - A psychological insight as opposed to audio Part 1 of 2

When I realized that this system would be my last major system change because of it's cost and my desire to retire soon, officially ending my ability to go to a higher level when it arrives, which it will cause it always does, I wanted a catchy name that might attract readers so that my thoughts and observations might help them with their fantasies and future audio decisions, I decided to call it My Bucket List System. At that point I was not focusing on the fact that this would be my single biggest purchase to date in my life, and that it is directly related to when to retire, it would no doubt trigger thoughts about what really matters to me so that I can prioritize appropriately.

Let me state that in my book, Bucket List is more about experiences than money, although many times money is needed to have the experience My personal feeling is that the best feelings are free and more the product of having wonderful people in your life than having money. Since my retirement was delayed to make this purchase because it was now or never and one of my lifelong goals, the entire process went way beyond audio and more towards what is important to me experientially before I go to the next level, whatever that is.

Therefore, I have been willing to be more inclined to take what I believe are more risks than normal, which means to do some things my gut suggest I pass on.

Last week Steve Williams, Marty and I went to Telluride CO, where Marty has had a luxury time share for the past 20 years. Even though it was my third time there, it is such a beautiful place that it virtually forces introspection. While I knew there would be audio talk because after all we are the tres (audio) amigos, I had no idea what would be the biggest lesson of the week, although my gut was trying to inform me for the past month, when Marty told me were going mountain biking. If you know Marty, then you know that his style is to underplay things and let you discover for yourself.

I, on the other hand, have been prone to too much presell, and thus tried not to give it too much thought, since I do not like this part of my personality since I am one of the people I frequently presell and thus increase the chance of unnecessary disappointment. In my presell to me, I thought the mountain biking would take place on the ski area slopes, which I had skied and could see, and thus deemed feasible, despite being out of shape (70 years old with little to no exercise) showing increasing signs that I need to get back in shape.

As the trip approached, I became increasingly concerned about the wisdom of this trip for me. When at the shop where we rented the bikes and obtained a guide, I asked how hard the trip is and they said not too bad, but then this is what they do for a living and their daily hobby and live in Telluride and thus altitude adjusted, and they are younger than my daughters.-------So I let my head make the decision instead of my much more realistic gut.

On the way up to the beginning of the trip, the guide mentioned that the trip is 14 miles, but no problem because it is downhill. Instead of hearing this as something to truly consider, I went with "good thing it is not 14 miles uphill (because that would be a definite no) but went with I should be able to do it, downhill, good balance and all." Somehow at that moment I forget about altitude sickness, which all of us had been battling, and in my case with quick episodes of tuning out for a second or two.

At first the trip was not very hard. I instantly started selling myself that as long as I remember my limits all would be well. Unfortunately, in the majesty of being in the mountains above 10,000 feet and not fatigued I said go forward. While the mountain bikes had very oversized tires and we were riding on combinations of compacted dirt and loose slippery fragments from previous dynamite explosions, I did not want to admit my fears limitations and probably most of all, my terrible state of being out of shape for which I have nobody to blame but myself.

The environment in which we were riding is impossible to describe because of its majestic beauty with one Vista being outdone by the next. If you’ve never been to Telluride or seen pictures, do yourself a favor and look up Telluride Colorado in your browser and click images and you’ll instantly understand what I’m talking about. As the road went on I was feeling pretty good, because it was downhill after all. After a couple of miles we were met by the fellow with the van and the bike trailer for our first snack and of course I concluded this trip is not a problem for me, although I forgot to add “at this point” to my thoughts. I had witnessed Steve having some troubles where I had none, which while I was concerned for Steve, also gave me a false sense of confidence and accomplishment.

A little farther down the trail we got to a point where Steve wisely decided to walk the steep part and I foolishly said to myself, not me, and when I successfully traversed that spot my confidence was boosted even further. I do not want to make this post as long as the 2 ½ to 3 hours it took to traverse the 14 miles despite it being downhill so I will skip a large portion that I’m sure Steve at this point would have rather skipped in reality because that was the segment where he ran into trouble including a face plant into a rock, but I fortunately had no serous problems. After an uphill trek where Marty and Steve were sucking some wind but for some reason I was not, I told myself that my concerns were unfounded and I should just chill and enjoy the beautiful experience.

Without trying to be dramatic envision a mountain slope that is dropping thousands of feet at an angle well in excess of 45 degrees where somebody has come along and blasted with ample amounts of dynamite this solid granite edifice to create a triangular wedge along which they could walk and in some places use as the bed for a very narrow gauge railroad to carry mining supplies and the fruits of their mining back down from their mines that were frequently above the 12,000 foot mark. For the most part there was enough width that as someone who is not afraid of heights and in fact likes heights I was rather comfortable because to that point which I’m told was about 7 miles into the trip I had managed to keep the mountain bike in continuous control even though it was perilously easy for it to go out of control if you were doing anything other than straight ahead and the front tire was on the ground. I now know that’s why many mountain bikers pull up their handlebars as they sit way back on their seat and change direction at least in part when the front tire is not on the ground acting like a shovel because it’s not going straight. Unfortunately this orientation means that instead of the sidewalls being responsible solely for keeping the tires aligned they were now sort of curving under the wheel causing the front tire not to track properly and to slide, which means if you don’t correct it within a second you are out of control.

I can’t tell you how fast what I’m about to describe happened or even why it happened although I have a theory that I believe is at least somewhat on target. I knew I was getting fatigued because even though it was downhill and for the most part within my skill range, I started for the first time on that trip to really experience short probably less than a second of cerebral altitude symptomatology, which felt like short

periods, maybe a second, of being totally spaced (i.e. not able to insure that I keep the handle bars straight so the front tire would not skid, increasing the chance that the bike would fall over as the side wall of the front tire rolled under the wheel and began plowing.
 

Mobiusman

Well-Known Member
May 25, 2010
640
299
535
Jersey Shore- waterside
Part 2 of 2 of the above post
As best I can remember, I looked up to see how Steve was doing, probably linked with a moment of altitude sickness and the next thing I knew was my clock was ringing very loud by hitting my head, namely my face directly on a rather sizable slab of granite that was on the uphill side of the trail which at that point was probably less than 2 feet wide. While truly stunned I realized my face did not appear to have any broken bones even though there is no doubt that I hit the granite directly with my face. I knew I was hurt, but not nearly as badly as my logic suggested I should be, as I tried to sit up I noticed that the piece of granite my hips was literally the only piece that had a surface so smooth that it looked like it was cut with a fine saw in that every other rock that I could see that surrounded the rock I hit was nothing but sharp jagged points. As somebody who is pretty spiritual, I instantly started thinking what is the chance that I would hit the one place that was smooth rather than any where else, where a sharp granite point would have pierced my face breaking bones possibly my skull if not entering my brain. I was already very humbled by how fortunate I was for reasons I did not understand and then tried to stand up and realized that I was too unstable, but before I sat back down for the first time I looked over the other edge of the trail a mere 2 feet away and saw that probably the first place I would have bounced had I gone off that side of the trail might have been up to a thousand feet down even though there was probably another thousand vertical feet before I would have come to my final, and I mean final, resting place.
Even though it’s been 3 ½ days since that accident, rarely does more than 20 minutes go by when I think about how amazingly fortunate both Steve and I were to have had such minor injuries compared to what I would have experienced if I turned the handle bars the other direction, which would have almost guaranteed my falling off the face of the mountain.
So why am I posting this on this post about my bucket list system rather than on Steve’s post about us going on this bike trip? It’s actually very simple. I am using this Bucket List model to increase the likelihood of doing things that will be important to me before I pass. But what this incident taught me is that even though it is undeniable that my time is limited and I should do everything I can to use it in the best possible way, these experiences will not reach their full benefit for me as I experience them unless I understand and remember how special they are so they will have the proper weighting in my mind.
So the two things I’ve learned from this experience are to think more about my state of mind as I experience top priority activities during the balance of my life, or maybe all of the time, and to remember that all important lesson that there is something bigger than me in charge and that there will be times I just do not know what or why things happen, but that does not mean the unexpected should take away from the positive of any experience. I also need to remember that the unexpected may be an encoded message that I do not understand at the time about just how special an event could be.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steve Williams

Joe P

Well-Known Member
May 11, 2019
300
230
45
39
A Bucket List By-Product - A psychological insight as opposed to audio Part 1 of 2

my terrible state of being out of shape for which I have nobody to blame but myself.
 

marty

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2010
2,042
1,551
670
United States
Seriously?...
"There's no relationship between high cholesterol and heart disease"
"I want to see your cholesterol between 250 and 300"
"If you're cholesterol is under 100, your brain will dry up"
Who the hell is this bozo? Total fraud. BTW, this is the same moron that says "chemotherapy only works 2% of the time".
 
  • Like
Reactions: cjfrbw

Steve Williams

Site Founder, Site Owner, Administrator
Seriously?...
"There's no relationship between high cholesterol and heart disease"
"I want to see your cholesterol between 250 and 300"
"If you're cholesterol is under 100, your brain will dry up"
Who the hell is this bozo? Total fraud. BTW, this is the same moron that says "chemotherapy only works 2% of the time".
I have to agree. When I saw the video it gave me great pause

Joe what were you trying to tell us?
 

Joe P

Well-Known Member
May 11, 2019
300
230
45
39
I have to agree. When I saw the video it gave me great pause

Joe what were you trying to tell us?

Just sharing some nutritional guidelines that have worked for me
 

QuadDiffusor

VIP/Donor
Apr 3, 2017
230
160
265
Hong Kong

QuadDiffusor

VIP/Donor
Apr 3, 2017
230
160
265
Hong Kong
Dr. Berg’s one of my favorites on YouTube. While at times he over simplifies complex concepts, he makes vital information accessible to the masses. Here’s a good primer:
 

andromedaaudio

VIP/Donor
Jan 23, 2011
5,137
510
610
Amsterdam holland
I do some sort of intermittent fasting too.
I skip breakfast and usually start eating around 11.00 -12:00 in the morning .
2 meals a day more then enough imo.
I do skip sometimes though , if the company booked a hotel incl breakfast and its too delicious to skip .
I lost a few pounds and it feels healthy
 

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
16,039
5,723
1,115
London
Cholestrol reminds me of a funny audio anecdote.

Two years ago, Gian put me in touch with two big dealers in Pescara, Italy. Rushing from work to airport on my first Pescara trip (covered in the Brinkmann TT shootout), I fell down the stairs and sprained my ankle bad. Still went over to the airport.

A couple of weeks or so later, on the eve of the second Pescara trip, I got some bad flu that led to joint pain. I went to check with the doc, asked for a blood test. The doc came back that no problem, nothing wrong with the joints, it's just flu (by now I was feeling normal anyway) but your platelet count is high. Don't google. Platelet count can be high due to bad reasons, or due to inflammation. So we need to check the count again two months later.

Obviously the doc said don't google, so I googled. Scared the sh*t out of me. For the next two months, I thought I was going to die. Gian asked me when I was writing the second Pescara report, but I had no interest as I thought that was it, I am done for. So I started eating real bad food, loads of desserts and other stuff everyday, fine dining daily. Ankle was still recovering so I was not exercising either.

Two months later I retook the platelet test, and now everything was back to normal, obviously, in retrospect I understood these things are common during inflammation, and get back to normal after your sprain or flu goes away. I didn't tell anyone then, just quietly ate away. I told my gf only after the second test that showed normal. But now thanks to a bad diet and no exercise my cholestrol was up.

Anyway its back to normal now. So cardio and diet have a clear correlation on my cholesterol. I still kick myself on how easily I panicked. But during that time I learned that docs have different perspectives on cholestrol, some think its just a number, and your genetic history is more important. Some think high HDL and low trigylceride is a good thing, in which case higher levels of LDL are fine.
 
Last edited:

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. This is THE place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss vintage, contemporary and new audio products, music servers, music streamers, computer audio, digital-to-analog converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel-to-reel tape machines, speakers, headphones and tube and solid-state amplification. Founded in 2010 What’s Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals, we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people, and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing