40,000 LP Record Collection For Sale

Elliot G.

Industry Expert
Jul 22, 2010
3,230
2,873
1,360
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
www.bendingwaveusa.com
Problem with many collections is the absence of an exquisite taste with record collecting. If one had this superb taste and did buy only the best, such a big collection equals in worth like a goldmine. But most collections I've seen have a high amount of rubbish records mixed with only some pearls. I don't know why people do mix their music this way and purchased so many bad and cheap records that have no style at all, but thats how it is. The majority of listeners in the 1970's or later bought the mainstream music, very rare they bought classical or jazz. And even if they do, they weren't able to fetch the to cream of its genre but mostly fetch the junk. I've seen top quality collections being sold after the owners death, but they are the absolute minority. The others have a very high percentage of junk or mainstream music in it, and thats beside the state of grading the records. Its just about the quality of the whole collection.
Walter, People bought rock because they liked rock, listened to rock and enjoyed rock. That's what young people ( not just them BTW)do and did. They probably played those crappy records like I did on my way to 6000 of them. The overwhelming amount of music purchased is not Classical nor Jazz. Look at the sales charts. When I was on H.S. and college that is what we did, we went to the record store to buy the album from the one song we heard on FM radio. Chicago, Led Zep, Jethro Tull, Allmans, Beatles, Stones etc. The music wasn't crap but many of the recordings were.
Exquisite taste? who's is that other than the guy buying the records. This attitude and belief that my liking is superior to someone else's opinion is what is wrong with all of these discussions.
If you listen to 100 percent of one type of music trust me you are the exception not the rule.
 

Ron Resnick

Site Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 24, 2015
15,777
12,822
2,665
Beverly Hills, CA
I think record collecting is yet another sub-hobby. I do not consider myself to be engaged actively in record collecting, as a standalone, discrete activity.
 
Last edited:

Mike Lavigne

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 25, 2010
12,374
11,154
4,410
you have your thoughts I have mine. Collecting is a worthwhile endeavor for some, not for me. This is my point and for those who can justify this process to themselves so be it and enjoy it. I own my gear to do singularly one thing, listen and that is not the same thing as collecting. I have only so much time and my way works great for all of my desires. I own the most enjoyable digital playback system I have ever encountered, I use Roon, Qobuz and a little Tidal have around 8tb of files ( at least half of which I have no idea where it came from LOL) and I get to travel the musical universe with my phone as a remote and a volume control device.
Mike its not the 1000-2000 pieces of software that one might actually rotate through although my guess is more like a few hundred, but 5-10-15-20K and beyond is just collecting it has little to do with listening to music as one needs a full time staff just to find and organize it.
Enjoy collecting all I said is it is not for me as its another addiction that I wont take part in again.
Anyone want to but a couple of thousand random cds? LOL
is that how you really feel? don't hold back. o_O

i have approximately 11,500 to 12,000 records. about 7500 are in my permanent collection, cleaned, organized and quickly accessible. i've played them all at some point over my 28 years of serious vinyl focus. at any time any of those could and will be played. many i can find in the dark. another 1000-1250 records are in my 'B' rack, mostly dups. then upstairs i have my 3000 that are my recent purchased collection. those are in great condition and organized, but not yet cleaned except for the first 150 i've pulled.

every few years i might move parts of the collection around as it grows and evolves. but even then, it's a couple of days of shifting and nothing i'm having to constantly mess with. so there is no 'work' to do at all. it's just there for me.

i have the lifestyle, and space, and relationship support to be free to enjoy my records, but it's certainly not for everyone. if i had a few grandkids i'd probably have fewer records and fewer tt's. i find plenty of satisfaction from the collection. it's worth it. i also have 3500-4000 CD's and SACD's that i have in the shelves in my room that are dormant, mostly they are ripped. they provide some diffusion for the sound and are not hurting anything. occasionally it's handy to be able to read the case-notes for information. rarely i will pull out a transport and play one. but i have the space for them so no worries.

so my collection is alive and well. you were here for 4 days last January, and saw my stuff. that was a period i was pretty understandably digital focused and at the beginning of my recent vinyl upgrade phase, so the vinyl stuff was only just ordered and so the digital was dominant. these last few months i'm more vinyl focused with daily vinyl playing on each turntable, and it's really very enjoyable. still digital every day too. i'm where i wanted to be.

i agree that what someone is doing with storerooms full of unopened boxes of records is different than what i'm doing. but maybe they had a plan, or have a plan, or are just investing. it's all good. on some levels maybe it's a waste of assets, or a great investment. but in any case it's nothing too bad. hopefully they are in some ways protecting vinyl for the next generation.

i suppose i'm a record collector, but i have no records that i don't play or are afraid to open....so i'm a record playing collector.
 
Last edited:

Walter66

Active Member
Aug 22, 2022
190
203
43
Walter, People bought rock because they liked rock, listened to rock and enjoyed rock. That's what young people ( not just them BTW)do and did. They probably played those crappy records like I did on my way to 6000 of them. The overwhelming amount of music purchased is not Classical nor Jazz. Look at the sales charts. When I was on H.S. and college that is what we did, we went to the record store to buy the album from the one song we heard on FM radio. Chicago, Led Zep, Jethro Tull, Allmans, Beatles, Stones etc. The music wasn't crap but many of the recordings were.
Exquisite taste? who's is that other than the guy buying the records. This attitude and belief that my liking is superior to someone else's opinion is what is wrong with all of these discussions.
If you listen to 100 percent of one type of music trust me you are the exception not the rule.
Where did I wrote that I listen to only one genre of music?
I played records since a very young age and know what people played and bought in the post- war economy, because I was there when it all happened. I even bought very rare punk records that today are worth many bucks.

But for real music, pop or rock music is mostly not, today it's the most processed music ever recorded. That may have changed since some decades, but even the Beatles or Stones were heavily post production products.

And it's even not what's all wrong with such discussions, it's just that you don't wan't to discuss this aspect, means the difference of the very best music recorded with the best equipment. Often you can find it with classical music, often with jazz. Just judge, when a recording feels like live even when its a studio album. Why don't they manage to do so today with pop/ rock music? Because its the kind of heavily postprocessed music.

If you like some fine rock music, the price often rises with the rarity. But that alone wouldn't make up against the perfect combination of rarity, perfect recording and a bunch of brilliant folks as musicians. Put that together with minimal post production, as near as possible master tape copies and an excellent pressing and here you are, the very rare recordings that will stand the test of time.

We all know, that's not going to be an AC/DC record, and you can bet, it's not a Rolling Stones one either. Despite of what the majority has bought and decided to be good to spend money on some decades ago. It just coun't and made the rarities from yesteryears even more worthfull because nobody wanted to purchase them.
 

Elliot G.

Industry Expert
Jul 22, 2010
3,230
2,873
1,360
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
www.bendingwaveusa.com
Where did I wrote that I listen to only one genre of music?
I played records since a very young age and know what people played and bought in the post- war economy, because I was there when it all happened. I even bought very rare punk records that today are worth many bucks.

But for real music, pop or rock music is mostly not, today it's the most processed music ever recorded. That may have changed since some decades, but even the Beatles or Stones were heavily post production products.

And it's even not what's all wrong with such discussions, it's just that you don't wan't to discuss this aspect, means the difference of the very best music recorded with the best equipment. Often you can find it with classical music, often with jazz. Just judge, when a recording feels like live even when its a studio album. Why don't they manage to do so today with pop/ rock music? Because its the kind of heavily postprocessed music.

If you like some fine rock music, the price often rises with the rarity. But that alone wouldn't make up against the perfect combination of rarity, perfect recording and a bunch of brilliant folks as musicians. Put that together with minimal post production, as near as possible master tape copies and an excellent pressing and here you are, the very rare recordings that will stand the test of time.

We all know, that's not going to be an AC/DC record, and you can bet, it's not a Rolling Stones one either. Despite of what the majority has bought and decided to be good to spend money on some decades ago. It just coun't and made the rarities from yesteryears even more worthfull because nobody wanted to purchase them.
no that's not it. Exquisite taste was my objection. I ve been told many times here that since I don't have a record collection that I cant be serious, or I dont have tubes, or horns or whatever that there is something wrong.
In my opinion the percentage of really great sounding records is extremely small out of my 6000 collection of great music IMO but not great surfaces or recordings etc. I find far more good sounding digital items today than I ever found with LPS.
Collecting is a different hobby period. It has little to do IMO with High End Audio as one doesn't need to collect to enjoy music and a great selection.
40k albums many sealed- someone really enjoyed listening ???
 

Elliot G.

Industry Expert
Jul 22, 2010
3,230
2,873
1,360
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
www.bendingwaveusa.com
is that how you really feel? don't hold back. o_O

i have approximately 11,500 to 12,000 records. about 7500 are in my permanent collection, cleaned, organized and quickly accessible. i've played them all at some point over my 28 years of serious vinyl focus. at any time any of those could and will be played. many i can find in the dark. another 1000-1250 records are in my 'B' rack, mostly dups. then upstairs i have my 3000 that are my recent purchased collection. those are in great condition and organized, but not yet cleaned except for the first 150 i've pulled.

every few years i might move parts of the collection around as it grows and evolves. but even then, it's a couple of days of shifting and nothing i'm having to constantly mess with. so there is no 'work' to do at all. it's just there for me.

i have the lifestyle, and space, and relationship support to be free to enjoy my records, but it's certainly not for everyone. if i had a few grandkids i'd probably have fewer records and fewer tt's. i find plenty of satisfaction from the collection. it's worth it. i also have 3500-4000 CD's and SACD's that i have in the shelves in my room that are dormant, mostly they are ripped. they provide some diffusion for the sound and are not hurting anything. occasionally it's handy to be able to read the case-notes for information. rarely i will pull out a transport and play one. but i have the space for them so no worries.

so my collection is alive and well. you were here for 4 days last January, and saw my stuff. that was a period i was pretty understandably digital focused and at the beginning of my recent vinyl upgrade phase, so the vinyl stuff was only just ordered and so the digital was dominant. these last few months i'm more vinyl focused with daily vinyl playing on each turntable, and it's really very enjoyable. still digital every day too. i'm where i wanted to be.

i agree that what someone is doing with storerooms full of unopened boxes of records is different than what i'm doing. but maybe they had a plan, or have a plan, or are just investing. it's all good. on some levels maybe it's a waste of assets, or a great investment. but in any case it's nothing too bad. hopefully they are in some ways protecting vinyl for the next generation.

i suppose i'm a record collector, but i have no records that i don't play or are afraid to open....so i'm a record playing collector.
well you are a Unicorn LOL. I said i have been in numerous homes with loads of records .In boxes, in storage areas sealed and never played etc. My point is this is not required nor needed to listen to high end systems with great music. Although on WBF I have been told otherwise.
 

Walter66

Active Member
Aug 22, 2022
190
203
43
no that's not it. Exquisite taste was my objection. I ve been told many times here that since I don't have a record collection that I cant be serious, or I dont have tubes, or horns or whatever that there is something wrong.
In my opinion the percentage of really great sounding records is extremely small out of my 6000 collection of great music IMO but not great surfaces or recordings etc. I find far more good sounding digital items today than I ever found with LPS.
Collecting is a different hobby period. It has little to do IMO with High End Audio as one doesn't need to collect to enjoy music and a great selection.
40k albums many sealed- someone really enjoyed listening ???
That's a really good question. Maybe a collector who loved ownership, we all know that sealed is the highest grade in record collecting.
But you are right with many other statements. My focus is on the music listening side, but sometimes it makes me wonder if thats what others in this hobby are, too. I've seen people with an EMT 927, lots of studio stuff but only a handfull of records. Too many love to swap equipment steadily and focus on listening to their equipment differences instead of music.
The amount of money spend on records is much higher and will always be as I'm total DIY in audio hardware.
But what I've auditioned is and always was, that very good equipment brings the listener closer to the source of music and lets the hifi aspect disappear. Think that's a good thing because closer to the soul and intention of the musical genius makes it all become more worthwile and understandable what people have created with music in their minds.
 

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
22,217
13,181
2,710
London
we all know that sealed is the highest grade in record collecting.
lol no, it usually gives away the age of the record as new, i.e. low value
 
  • Like
Reactions: Salectric

dminches

Well-Known Member
Oct 22, 2011
3,392
2,778
1,410
lol no, it usually gives away the age of the record as new, i.e. low value

I think what he meant is that if you 2 identical records, the sealed one has a great market value. Frankly, I’d rather have the NM- one which I know has no defects.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steveo

microstrip

VIP/Donor
May 30, 2010
20,806
4,695
2,790
Portugal
(...) i have approximately 11,500 to 12,000 records. about 7500 are in my permanent collection, cleaned, organized and quickly accessible. i've played them all at some point over my 28 years of serious vinyl focus. at any time any of those could and will be played. many i can find in the dark. another 1000-1250 records are in my 'B' rack, mostly dups. then upstairs i have my 3000 that are my recent purchased collection. those are in great condition and organized, but not yet cleaned except for the first 150 i've pulled. (...)

A fast guess tells me this is more than one record per day ... Do you have them in a computer accessible database?
 

Kingrex

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2019
2,640
2,107
350
I have 2000 CD ripped to my drive. I have maybe 70 tapes. I have maybe 200 records of which about 40 I listen too on a regular basis.
last night I had 3 cocktails. I started with 2 tapes I really love. Then I walked the dog, sat in the hot tub while he chased rats in the dark, then I came in an played about 10 sides of vinyl before going to bed.

I enjoy that whole process more than turning on my 2000 rips and letting them play. I find at times the digital just goes on and on and on and on and on. I need the break. The record side ends. I get up, sleeve it, grab something new, set it up, then sit back and relax again for 10 to 20 minutes.
My digital is a godsend on weekends when I have the music play in the background. Sometimes there is something I want to hear and really listen too. Then I go to digital.

I do have one issue with records. I have quite a few that are crap. They don't play well or I don't care for the music. I find it hard to motivate to get rid of them. For the most part, they are low value. So they build up. I took one batch to the record store. The guy was willing to offer nothing for them. I'm sure that is all part of their game. My point is that amassing too many records for me is the lack of ambition to get rid of the duds. It takes work. It may also be a part of why some people have more vinyl than appears to be needed.
 

TooCool4

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2013
951
928
925
England
Analog should be kept "analog" ...
:cool:
Don’t agree with you, I have all my LP’s, Cassettes and CD’s catalogued on the computer and in the cloud. It’s wonderful to know everything I have and be able to go out and buy new music without the risk of buying duplicates, which is something I have done many times in the past. These days I only buy duplicates when I am looking for a better copy.

Since having Music Collectorz software, I can pull it up on my phone and know what I am about to buy I don’t already own.
My searchable database is here
 

wil

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2015
1,468
1,495
398
My experience of listening to digital (streamed or files) is nothing like what Rex (and some others) describe.

I usually listen to an album one at a time with full attention. If the recording is a good one, I find it so compelling that it’s uncomfortable to relegate it to the background.

If well recorded music in digital format isn’t interesting, I’d look for the reason in one’s digital music setup.
 
Last edited:

Kingrex

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2019
2,640
2,107
350
My experience of listening to digital (streamed or files) is nothing like what Rex (and some others) describe.

I usually listen to an album one at a time with full attention. If the recording is a good one, I find it so compelling that it’s uncomfortable to relegate it to the background.

If well recorded music in digital format isn’t compelling I’d look for the reason in one’s system/setup.
I don't have the money to move beyond my Mojo Audio Mystique V3 DAC and Deja Vu server. They are excellent for the money. But I don't think they would compare to a Taiko server going to Lampizator or even one of Mojo's new DAC. Budget and time have made me focus towards a couple sources. I can't have them all pristine.

I love my digital for getting into Spotify and letting the Discover Weekly serve me up weekend music. I love my digital when we have guest and I have a couple playlist for parties, dinner etc. I love my digital to find new music. I personally have gotten to a place where when I sit to really listen, I like to pluck through my hard copies, find one that is capturing my attention, then put it on.

FWIW, I think there is more opportunity to find versions of albums that are high quality via streaming than with Vinyl. Digital does let you try a version, skip it, try another, skip try another and success, a well playing copy. I have multiple crap versions of certain classical albums of which I like the song, but don't have a good copy to listen too. Finding good playing vinyl can be very frustrating. When I do, its a blessing. And I really do need to bring 50 or more bad purchases back to the record shop to free space in my storage cabinets. I am running out of space.

If budget were not a constraint, I don't think you could go wrong with either source with todays options.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wil

Solypsa

Well-Known Member
Jun 7, 2017
1,811
1,394
275
Seattle
www.solypsa.com
I even bought very rare punk records that today are worth many bucks
May we have a 'walter66' punk playlist? I am not joking ;)
 

Walter66

Active Member
Aug 22, 2022
190
203
43
May we have a 'walter66' punk playlist? I am not joking ;)
My vote goes to:
1.Discharge
2. GBH/ The exploited
3.riistetyt/ propaganda/kaaos
 
  • Like
Reactions: Solypsa

Walter66

Active Member
Aug 22, 2022
190
203
43
lol no, it usually gives away the age of the record as new, i.e. low value
Bonzo,
according to this website and even to the goldmine standard, still sealed (S/S) records rank higher than a mint record.
S/S doesn't mean the records have to be new, I purchased still sealed records in cellophane shrink foil that were some forty years old but never opened. And it could be exactly the same with this collection, or do you think the owner bought those directly from the factory just recently?

This is very logical as they are absolute virgin records, so called NOS. And NOS is always the highest ranking in condition and price. They are pristine and perfect, never opened, never used before.


https://www.cvinyl.com/help-grading.php
 
Last edited:

bonzo75

Member Sponsor
Feb 26, 2014
22,217
13,181
2,710
London
Bonzo,
according to this website and even to the goldmine standard, still sealed (S/S) records rank higher than a mint record.
S/S doesn't mean the records have to be new, I purchased still sealed records in cellophane shrink foil that were some forty years old but never opened. And it could be exactly the same with this collection, or do you think the owner bought those directly from the factory just recently?

This is very logical as they are absolute virgin records, so called NOS. And NOS is always the highest ranking in condition and price. They are pristine and perfect, never opened, never used before.


https://www.cvinyl.com/help-grading.php

good luck finding old records sealed.
 

About us

  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. This is THE place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss vintage, contemporary and new audio products, music servers, music streamers, computer audio, digital-to-analog converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel-to-reel tape machines, speakers, headphones and tube and solid-state amplification. Founded in 2010 What’s Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals, we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people, and participating in spirited debates.

Quick Navigation

User Menu

Steve Williams
Site Founder | Site Owner | Administrator
Ron Resnick
Site Co-Owner | Administrator
Julian (The Fixer)
Website Build | Marketing Managersing