Why does my TV sound more real?

There are quite a few reasons why TV sound might sound better than a dedicated HiFi system.

1. There are errors in the HiFi system. e.g., out of phase/polarity.
2. There are some inherent problems with playing CDs that produce unnatural tonality, loss of ambient information, loss of coherence including, but not limited to,
- scattered laser light
- internal and external vibration impact on CD system,
- wobble and flutter of the CD while spinning,
- static electric charge buildup on the CD
3. live broadcasts can have a lot of “air” and dimensionality
Never said that the TV sounds better than my HiFi system.
Never said I had a CD player.
 
I thought you said the tv sounded better than your system you had just listened to. Maybe I misread your post. :) Not to mention many of the issues with CD playback apply to vinyl as well.
 
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I thought you said the tv sounded better than your system you had just listened to. Maybe I misread your post. :) Not to mention many of the issues with CD playback apply to vinyl as well.
Um, as TV’s and CD’s are both digital, why would I be astounded if a concert played live over my TV sounded better than a CD player playing a recording? Why wouldn’t a TV sound better?

Let me reiterate: After listening to different SET amps (2A3’s, 300B’s, 211’s etc.) on Youtube on my computer (digital) through a Dragonfly DAC and Audeze headphones (some other megabuck systems too) I switched to my vinyl two channel rig (tricked out Garrard 301, Reed 5A tonearm, Phasemation PP2000 MC cartridge, Phasemation T2000 SUT’s, Ypsilon phono stage, Ayon Spitfire SET amplifier, Altec VOT A7 speakers) and tried (again) to like the music from a Deutsche Gramophone “Original Source” record. Alas, the Original Source for those records was a quadraphonic master and I think that the processing they use to turn quadraphonic into stereo degrades it somehow so that it, like most of the Youtube videos, didn’t have the realness in tone or emotion that I subsequently got listening to a live orchestral performance on my TV later that day.

It was not the first time that I had been taken back by the realistic tones of acoustic instruments and voice on my television, so I decided to take a chance (knowing I would be attacked by those less secure) and just put it out there for members of this forum to ponder. Has anyone else out there noticed how good TV can reproduce music these days? If so, and secure enough in their status as an audiophile and hearing ability to ignore the Trolls and say so, then please do … and postulate as to what factors they think accounts for such, and are they applicable to our hobby?

That is the thinking behind my original post…wordier than the OP, but apparently I did not explain it well enough in the OP.
 
Hey, I’m on your side, I have oft observed that audiophile systems vary widely in their SQ, esp. in terms of realism and tonality and emotional response. By the way TVs sounded even more real and more emotionally connected back before they went digital.

Rensselaer wrote, “That is the thinking behind my original post…wordier than the OP, but apparently I did not explain it well enough in the OP.”

>>> I understood exactly what you meant In the OP.
 
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the sony bravia oled tv => "....speaker is the screen of the TV..." ???

the sound is being emitted from the TV screen?

the TV screen is the transducer that reproduce the sound?

what are the frequency response of this tv screen transducer?

my guess: from 150hz to 15kHz. So wouldn't it be kinda like a full-range single-driver transducer?

my experiences with full-range single driver speaker systems, without the usual suite of frequency dividing networks to split up the spectrum, are that they tend to sound closer to real life.
 
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I don’t think it is that you and I hear any better than anyone else, but differently perhaps. I am now certain that many people on this website can not hear a difference between digital and analogue, which is not to say one is any better than the other, just that to some of us, maybe a minority, the more music is processed (in any way), the more unreal it sounds.

Watch, several will now attack me for mentioning a difference between analogue and digital, but that isn’t what I am saying. What I am saying is the more music is processed, the less real it sounds.

To the best of my knowledge, those “Original Source” records are pure analogue, but I do suspect that in the “process” of converting an already edited to four channel ”quadraphonic” master, into a two channel “stereo” master, may be the fact responsible for us finding such less-than-real-sounding.
I must amend my last opinion about”Original Source “ recordings from Deutsche Gramophone. Since writing the above, I have replaced my Ayon Spitfire integrated with an Ongaku tribute 211 amp built by Ken at OTOMON Labs in Japan. Now the Carlos Kleiber (Beethoven Symphony Nr. 7) is MUCH more dynamic and musical (haven’t listened to the rest but assume similar differences secondary to my amplifier change). My apologies to Deutsche Gramophone for dismissive comments about their product.
 
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the sony bravia oled tv => "....speaker is the screen of the TV..." ???

the sound is being emitted from the TV screen?

the TV screen is the transducer that reproduce the sound?

what are the frequency response of this tv screen transducer?

my guess: from 150hz to 15kHz. So wouldn't it be kinda like a full-range single-driver transducer?

my experiences with full-range single driver speaker systems, without the usual suite of frequency dividing networks to split up the spectrum, are that they tend to sound closer to real life.
I understand that the Sony tv screen does act as a diaphragm with excitor attached, which is similar to a DML ( Distributed mode loudspeaker ) to learn more on this technology just type in podiumsound once you are in the six moons website. I do use this particular tv and DML loudspeakers ( near 15 yrs now for the loudspeakers).
 
Have you found other programs on your TV that sound very good or was this an outlier?
Occasionally, I am taken back by how good my tv can sound. Mind you, tv’s have come a long way over the years. When I was a kid tv pictures were only in black and white, you changed the channels manually and usually had to adjust horizontal and vertical tracking each time you did. Spent quality time with my dad by taking valves/tubes from the back of the tv to the grocery store so we could check each one on the tube checker there. Today, I am also astounded by being able to watch a Netflix movie in 4k on a thin iPad held in one hand while in bed at night.
 
Occasionally, I am taken back by how good my tv can sound. Mind you, tv’s have come a long way over the years. When I was a kid tv pictures were only in black and white, you changed the channels manually and usually had to adjust horizontal and vertical tracking each time you did. Spent quality time with my dad by taking valves/tubes from the back of the tv to the grocery store so we could check each one on the tube checker there. Today, I am also astounded by being able to watch a Netflix movie in 4k on a thin iPad held in one hand while in bed at night.

I grew up with a small black and white TV as well, with very few program options. We spend less time in front of "screens"...

Modest gear can provide a very pleasurable listening experience. I enjoy listening to music on my Samsung tablet, which has two puny speakers, but that offer a very clear sound. I find it has a lot to do with expectations, and our ability to focus on the music as opposed to the "sound".
 
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"Interestingly, emotional stimulation from live music extended beyond the amygdala, prompting a more active exchange of information throughout the whole brain. This indicates that live music doesn’t just intensify emotional reactions but also engages broader cognitive and affective networks. Such engagement points to a comprehensive processing of emotions and suggests that live music might facilitate a more complex integration of emotional and cognitive responses, potentially enhancing the overall listening experience."

It wasn't covered in the study above, but I believe that watching a performance on TV also hits areas of the brain that are not activated by pure listening.

My TV is fed from a very clean network, via Toslink with iPurifier SPDIF and linear power, to an exaSound DAC. It doesn't sound as good as my USB renderer into the same DAC, but it doesn't seem to matter. If I compare the same music on both, there's no real contest, but when a video is playing, I don't dwell on the sound quality in the same way I do with my audio system.

Also, I've noted a very clear difference when playing my stereo for visitors vs. a live performance on the TV system. Not everyone cares about great audio, but a live performance on video gets almost everyone's attention.
 
Lots of things can sound surprisingly good sometimes. Car stereos, cassettes, Youtube videos, portable players, Sony Walkman headphones, Punch way above their weight class. :oops:
 
I have often noticed the same thing you are speaking of (in several ways). The sound of a song on a TV program or a movie you are watching will often sound more engaging with the TV sound or movie sound. This observation is often noticed, even with a modest home theatre set up, when watching a tv program or movie. You can find the same song (sometimes even off a movie soundtrack recording) and play it on a much better, more high end audio system and it won't sound as compelling.

I've come to the realization that it all has to do with EQ. Songs and music on movies and TV shows have almost always been EQ'd by the movie or show's sound production team. They will make vocals more apparent or more in the foreground (make them pop), or they will accentuate a certain group of frequencies in the bass to give the movie a certain involving drive. Or they might accentuate certain higher frequency effects to draw your attention to various sound effects. The list goes on with a bucket full of tricks (done very cleverly due to much experience) that media production teams use to enhance the drama of the movie or TV show. That's what it really comes down to!
 

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