What is the Sound of Front Wall Diffusion?

Artnet

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New to acoustic treatments ...
Hope this discussion is okay on your thread. Good to be learning and a bit new also!
 

MTB Vince

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Well, initially i was thinking front wall and rear wall. The rear wall is compromised by double doors and the piano so was thinking 2 x N11 and 1 N13 up and absorption panel below mostly behind piano.

Loving this suggestion. It may not work out exactly like that due to a window one side (not floor to ceiling) and shelving unit the other. But a good solution to think on and develop given the compromised nature of the rear wall.

On the front wall in a triangulated pattern, N31 in the center slightly elevated from the floor, allowing for an existing artwork above, that will go eventually to be replaced with another N31. Then left and right N19's with deep base absorbers below them (thinking the Foley type) that will be behind the speakers.

Only amps in the center on plinths and all other equipment is being moved to the side, replacing Vinyl storage shelf with lower equipment rack allowing more treatment area on the wall. Current listening in plywood boxes for easy access the rest to another room.



I am safer starting slowly with the 3 QRD's, for front and 2 deep broadband absorptive panels. Then the side and rear walls.
I need to be conscious of other members of the household but usually if it improves the music its okay.
See how far I can go before the ceiling cloud. I will let you know
Very must appreciate the Reflective and absorbing nature of your input thank you.
Allot to get excited about there!
With your current loudspeaker spacing from the front wall, the well depth of the diffusers you are proposing does not work. As proposed your loudspeaker sound sources will be situated within the diffuser's nearfield. A 10" well depth requires the acoustic center of the loudspeaker or the listener's ears to be 10 feet away from the face of the diffuser to avoid unpleasant, wiry sounding comb filtering of the reflections. Hence my recommendation of sticking with the big QRD units at the rear of the room.

If you want to incorporate some diffusion on the front wall, You would be better to stick with a simple phase coherent diffuser design, polycylindrical diffusers. Poly diffusers don't make reflections sound weird when you get close to them. As a bonus, large poly diffusers can do double duty as bass traps if you lightly fill the large cavity behind with pink fluffy fiberglass insulation. Another alternative option would be a hybrid of a poly and a numerical diffuser/absorber. You build three large vertical poly diffusers to place at .25, .5, and .75 of your front wall width. But in this case the thin curved plywood face of the poly is first drilled with a Binary Amplitude Diffuser 1/2" hole pattern before installation. Then again prior to installation, a 2" depth of black melamine acoustic foam or polyester fiber (3lb/cu ft) insulation is glued in placed behind the holes.
 

MTB Vince

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Just reading about Homogeneous diffusion, discussing the benefits of using multiple identical periods or diffuses as opposed to one large one. ie using 5 x N7 as opposed to 1 x N19.
Hope the use of 3 covers this but may revisit this.
If you intend to use multiples of the same diffuser along the same stretch of wall, you need to modulate the diffuser array. Otherwise adjacent identical repeats of the same diffuser will cause undesirable frequency response lobing (a ragged, lumpy spectral response) of the diffused reflection. My rear wall diffuser array uses 5 identical N7x7 fractal QRD diffusers. So I modulated the array by mounting the 5 diffusers at three different distances from the rear wall. The central unit is mounted 2" off the wall, the flanking pair 4" off the wall, and the outermost pair mounted flush to the wall. IMG_0311.JPG
 
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Artnet

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So in a 26' long listening space and theoretically lets say all the space was available.
If I use a 400Hz QRD it puts my loudspeaker 13.3' of the front wall to be effective. This includes the depth of the QRD. With a listening position that is comfortable 7 to 8' or more from the loudspeaker there is not enough space to accommodate rear wall reflection?
If I use a 600 Hz QRD it puts my loudspeaker 8.5' of the front wall to be effective and the scenario is a little better but not ideal.

Is it correct to use the same distance for rear wall reflection from loudspeaker and or listening position? ie in the 400Hz option another 13.3'

All things considered the advice from your earlier post seems the more effective approach, employing the QRD's on the rear and side wall with more absorption at the front.
fractal QRD diffusers
These need some further reading up on as do the Poly Diffusers.
 

MTB Vince

Well-Known Member
May 11, 2019
177
193
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Dundas, ON Canada
So in a 26' long listening space and theoretically lets say all the space was available.
If I use a 400Hz QRD it puts my loudspeaker 13.3' of the front wall to be effective. This includes the depth of the QRD. With a listening position that is comfortable 7 to 8' or more from the loudspeaker there is not enough space to accommodate rear wall reflection?
If I use a 600 Hz QRD it puts my loudspeaker 8.5' of the front wall to be effective and the scenario is a little better but not ideal.

Is it correct to use the same distance for rear wall reflection from loudspeaker and or listening position? ie in the 400Hz option another 13.3'

All things considered the advice from your earlier post seems the more effective approach, employing the QRD's on the rear and side wall with more absorption at the front.

These need some further reading up on as do the Poly Diffusers.
@Artnet , it appears that you understand the math now. However I just went back into my reference's and realized I've been incorrectly stating the minimum distance is 4x the diffusor's lower cut-off frequency wavelength. DOOOOOH! My addled 57 year old brain has led you (25%) astray. According to Cox and Antonio (of RPG acoustics), minimum mounting distance best practice is actually only 3X this wavelength to avoid audible comb filtering of the diffused reflections! My profound apologies.

However in both mounting cases, the measured distance of diffuser-to-listening position and diffuser-to-loudspeaker's acoustic center, we measure from the diffuser's front face. So for the diffuser with a low frequency design cut-off of 400Hz and therefore a wavelength of 33.76", the minimum distance requirement should be 3x 33.76" or 8.44 feet from the face of the diffuser.

Again, I sincerely apologize for the unintended misdirection.
 
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Artnet

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Again, I sincerely apologize
Not at all. don't worry.
I thank you for the discussion, it convinces me the only way to do this is to understand it.
It can be an off the shelf item for some or a trial and error for others. Now discovering so much literature and peoples experiences, learning is essential and this has helped!
My addled 57 year old brain
I have got one of these as well, Its the 57 year old body I don't want to stress to much. It is a lot of work to build and I want it to work so my only hurry is to understand more before building. Then I can develop as intelligently as the brain will allow.

So with revised figures, in theory if I have the whole room, a 400hz QRD can provide me a solution but with 6.5' listening position from speakers. With not much room to move forward or backward :) .

I will have to think that one through.
 

Gunnar

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I hope it’s OK to jump in. If so I appreciate to get some comments, thoughts and maybe recommendations. For quite some time I have been thinking of treating my front wall with something easy to put up and take down. Not allowed to have something fixed….. I have a great sound but as most of us I believe it could be even better. Logical I think it should be diffusers but will a diffuser be too close to the loudspeakers?

The room is open on the right side. Total size >70 m2 with the living room corner 4,6 meter wide and 6,7 meter long. Ceiling, to the beams 3 meter. Listenposition 4,2 meter from the loudspeakers. From back wall to listening position 1,2 meter, The loudspeakers (baffle) are 1,2 m from front wall and approx. 1,1 meter from the side walls. Between the baffles there are 2,2 m. The space between the inner wall and the window is deep, 0,7 meter. So space for a diffuser. The back wall is close to a copy paste of the front wall.

I have already basstraps in the front corners, absorbers on the first réflexion on the left side and a diffuser taking care of the first reflection on the left side from the right speaker. No treatment in the front nor in the back. Just a basstrap on the left side in the back corner. Some absorbers also in the ceiling. All treatments from HOFA. They also measured the room prior proposing. The mistake I made then (5 years ago) was that I gave them limitations of what was possible to do. Front and back walls were for example excluded. Since HOFA I have made a few upgrades so I guess time to revis……..

My question is. Would it make sense to put some treatments between the speakers?

Gunnar
 

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Addicted to hifi

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I hope it’s OK to jump in. If so I appreciate to get some comments, thoughts and maybe recommendations. For quite some time I have been thinking of treating my front wall with something easy to put up and take down. Not allowed to have something fixed….. I have a great sound but as most of us I believe it could be even better. Logical I think it should be diffusers but will a diffuser be too close to the loudspeakers?

The room is open on the right side. Total size >70 m2 with the living room corner 4,6 meter wide and 6,7 meter long. Ceiling, to the beams 3 meter. Listenposition 4,2 meter from the loudspeakers. From back wall to listening position 1,2 meter, The loudspeakers (baffle) are 1,2 m from front wall and approx. 1,1 meter from the side walls. Between the baffles there are 2,2 m. The space between the inner wall and the window is deep, 0,7 meter. So space for a diffuser. The back wall is close to a copy paste of the front wall.

I have already basstraps in the front corners, absorbers on the first réflexion on the left side and a diffuser taking care of the first reflection on the left side from the right speaker. No treatment in the front nor in the back. Just a basstrap on the left side in the back corner. Some absorbers also in the ceiling. All treatments from HOFA. They also measured the room prior proposing. The mistake I made then (5 years ago) was that I gave them limitations of what was possible to do. Front and back walls were for example excluded. Since HOFA I have made a few upgrades so I guess time to revis……..

My question is. Would it make sense to put some treatments between the speakers?

Gunnar
Nice system and room. its good idea to try them out all over the place and see if they make a difference to the sound quality.
 

Gunnar

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Thanks, For sure that would be the best “try” and find out. But it would mean that I need to buy quite a few pieces without really knowing what type to buy.

What I hope from the forum, if possible, is to get an indication of which way to go. For example in the hole close to the left speaker probably a diffuser and behind the right speaker an absorber or the opposite. Or maybe better to go for a combined diffuser / absorber.

You see?
 
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Addicted to hifi

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Thanks, For sure that would be the best “try” and find out. But it would mean that I need to buy quite a few pieces without really knowing what type to buy.

What I hope from the forum, if possible, is to get an indication of which way to go. For example in the hole close to the left speaker probably a diffuser and behind the right speaker an absorber or the opposite. Or maybe better to go for a combined diffuser / absorber.

You see?
I haven’t experimented much so cart answer your question.I have two diffusions on each side of the wall just in front of the speakers.
 
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Gunnar

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I think the normal is one diffuser at first reflection. At least for a normal room. For me as it’s open on the right side complicates things. Before HOFA came in I tried to evaluate my room myself. Bought the recommended microphone. Downloaded REW. And realised that it was over my technical skill. Was not able to calibrate the microphone…… So found HOFA. I am done on the Switch “side”. Bought a S100 modified by Pink Faun. Really good. Waiting to get four Furutechs outlet installed. So a new small project “can I improve the acoustics?” I am fairly sure but??
 

benito

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Jul 23, 2018
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I hope it’s OK to jump in. If so I appreciate to get some comments, thoughts and maybe recommendations. For quite some time I have been thinking of treating my front wall with something easy to put up and take down. Not allowed to have something fixed….. I have a great sound but as most of us I believe it could be even better. Logical I think it should be diffusers but will a diffuser be too close to the loudspeakers?

The room is open on the right side. Total size >70 m2 with the living room corner 4,6 meter wide and 6,7 meter long. Ceiling, to the beams 3 meter. Listenposition 4,2 meter from the loudspeakers. From back wall to listening position 1,2 meter, The loudspeakers (baffle) are 1,2 m from front wall and approx. 1,1 meter from the side walls. Between the baffles there are 2,2 m. The space between the inner wall and the window is deep, 0,7 meter. So space for a diffuser. The back wall is close to a copy paste of the front wall.

I have already basstraps in the front corners, absorbers on the first réflexion on the left side and a diffuser taking care of the first reflection on the left side from the right speaker. No treatment in the front nor in the back. Just a basstrap on the left side in the back corner. Some absorbers also in the ceiling. All treatments from HOFA. They also measured the room prior proposing. The mistake I made then (5 years ago) was that I gave them limitations of what was possible to do. Front and back walls were for example excluded. Since HOFA I have made a few upgrades so I guess time to revis……..

My question is. Would it make sense to put some treatments between the speakers?

Gunnar
I am not an expert but your walls have a lot of rugosity and may already act as a diffusor. I have been in contact with Delta H Design, they do not have a dealer in Europe, so you have to buy them directly from them with a big money increase (shipping, import taxes and VTA).

To test if I needed to have some treatments, I put behind my speakers panels made of wood, cotton and "chanvre" (do not know the name in english, but it is a plant, sister of the canabis but without THC). It works: sound is cleaner and the sound stage is larger, deeper. Lost some high mainly in piano.
At the present time, I am trying to get some wood wool panels since they have a lot of rugosity.bNot find yet in south west of France.
 
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Mike Lavigne

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certainly the backwall behind the speakers is an issue. especially with the proximity of the speakers to the wall. but my first question would be have you investigated removing the sofa/setee from in front of the speakers? is that not an option? these questions are always sensitive and your space is beautiful and elegant. and i'm a neanderthal with a dedicated room without aesthetic concerns.

my guess is that wall treatment choices might be different with and without that sofa/settee.

if the sofa were not there i would pull the speakers away from the wall some. even 6 inches might be significant. btw; i tried to identify your speakers in case they were 'Naim' noticing your Naim electronics. i know some Naim speakers are designed to be close to walls. in any case i have a friend with a superlative Naim system. great stuff! congrats.

btw; they do make floor standing clear glass/acrylic diffusers; in your room those might be helpful as you try them and not have to mess with your wall. the room would retain it's look.
 
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Cellcbern

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I hope it’s OK to jump in. If so I appreciate to get some comments, thoughts and maybe recommendations. For quite some time I have been thinking of treating my front wall with something easy to put up and take down. Not allowed to have something fixed….. I have a great sound but as most of us I believe it could be even better. Logical I think it should be diffusers but will a diffuser be too close to the loudspeakers?

The room is open on the right side. Total size >70 m2 with the living room corner 4,6 meter wide and 6,7 meter long. Ceiling, to the beams 3 meter. Listenposition 4,2 meter from the loudspeakers. From back wall to listening position 1,2 meter, The loudspeakers (baffle) are 1,2 m from front wall and approx. 1,1 meter from the side walls. Between the baffles there are 2,2 m. The space between the inner wall and the window is deep, 0,7 meter. So space for a diffuser. The back wall is close to a copy paste of the front wall.

I have already basstraps in the front corners, absorbers on the first réflexiohen on the left side and a diffuser taking care of the first reflection on the left side from the right speaker. No treatment in the front nor in the back. Just a basstrap on the left side in the back corner. Some absorbers also in the ceiling. All treatments from HOFA. They also measured the room prior proposing. The mistake I made then (5 years ago) was that I gave them limitations of what was possible to do. Front and back walls were for example excluded. Since HOFA I have made a few upgrades so I guess time to revis……..

My question is. Would it make sense to put some treatments between the speakers?

Gunnar
Hard to tell from the photos which don't show the whole room, but it looks like you have the ability to flip the speakers to the wall where the component rack is and vice versa. It also looks like you could move the sofa that is currently in front of the speakers to the space opposite the wall where the equipment rack currently is. I would try that no matter what you use on the walls, but even if you don't move anything (I would move the sofa from in front of the speakers no matter what) in my experience the best thing to use behind the speakers is the DHDI ZR Acoustics panels (see the thread "Trying the ZR Acoustics Panels" at this forum). In my experience they are superior to all conventional room treatments - absorbers, diffusors, and traps. Since the best sound with the DHDI ZR panels comes from having the speakers right up against them their use also saves you space. Note also that since the ZR panels treat all frequencies you might not need the tube traps with them, or at least not as many. Put the ZR panels in floater frames and hang them like a piece of art. Then you can put them up when you listen and take them down if your better half doesn't want to look at them. Note however that the "Sample Rate" panels are attractive enough that she might be OK with leaving them up (see photos):
 

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Gunnar

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I am not an expert but your walls have a lot of rugosity and may already act as a diffusor. I have been in contact with Delta H Design, they do not have a dealer in Europe, so you have to buy them directly from them with a big money increase (shipping, import taxes and VTA).

To test if I needed to have some treatments, I put behind my speakers panels made of wood, cotton and "chanvre" (do not know the name in english, but it is a plant, sister of the canabis but without THC). It works: sound is cleaner and the sound stage is larger, deeper. Lost some high mainly in piano.
At the present time, I am trying to get some wood wool panels since they have a lot of rugosity.bNot find yet in south west of FrancE
I am not an expert but your walls have a lot of rugosity and may already act as a diffusor. I have been in contact with Delta H Design, they do not have a dealer in Europe, so you have to buy them directly from them with a big money increase (shipping, import taxes and VTA).

To test if I needed to have some treatments, I put behind my speakers panels made of wood, cotton and "chanvre" (do not know the name in english, but it is a plant, sister of the canabis but without THC). It works: sound is cleaner and the sound stage is larger, deeper. Lost some high mainly in piano.
At the present time, I am trying to get some wood wool panels since they have a lot of rugosity.bNot find yet in south west of France.
Corect, my wall is a crepi
I am not an expert but your walls have a lot of rugosity and may already act as a diffusor. I have been in contact with Delta H Design, they do not have a dealer in Europe, so you have to buy them directly from them with a big money increase (shipping, import taxes and VTA).

To test if I needed to have some treatments, I put behind my speakers panels made of wood, cotton and "chanvre" (do not know the name in english, but it is a plant, sister of the canabis but without THC). It works: sound is cleaner and the sound stage is larger, deeper. Lost some high mainly in piano.
At the present time, I am trying to get some wood wool panels since they have a lot of rugosity.bNot find yet in south west of France.
The reply whent of by mistake. Yes, my wall is a little bit rough but just +- 1 cm. As said a crepi. Not sure if that has a big impact. To buy directly from US seems complicated. It‘s a good idea to try with isolation material. Will give it a try. We have chanvre or hemp I think the translation to English is as isolation material on the roof.
 

Gunnar

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Mar 24, 2021
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certainly the backwall behind the speakers is an issue. especially with the proximity of the speakers to the wall. but my first question would be have you investigated removing the sofa/setee from in front of the speakers? is that not an option? these questions are always sensitive and your space is beautiful and elegant. and i'm a neanderthal with a dedicated room without aesthetic concerns.

my guess is that wall treatment choices might be different with and without that sofa/settee.

if the sofa were not there i would pull the speakers away from the wall some. even 6 inches might be significant. btw; i tried to identify your speakers in case they were 'Naim' noticing your Naim electronics. i know some Naim speakers are designed to be close to walls. in any case i have a friend with a superlative Naim system. great stuff! congrats.

btw; they do make floor standing clear glass/acrylic diffusers; in your room those might be helpful as you try them and not have to mess with your wall. the room would retain it's look.
My loudspeakers are Kudos Titan 808. (Isn’t it possible to see it in my profile?) The sofa is impossible to move. No other place for it and my suggestion to replace it got a NO. For sure the wall is not optimum. I guess the the two “holes” is the main issue. Our house is very old and I can add that we have no 90 degrees corner neither. The front wall left to right goes out close to 15 cm. Fortunately the floor is a piece of concrete slabs with a thickness of 30 cm. Rock solid.

I am afraid to move the loudspeakers further out as they then will get too close to the sofa. I think that clear glass / acrylic diffusers could be an option. I think Svanå in Sweden makes them.Thanks
 

Gunnar

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Mar 24, 2021
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Hard to tell from the photos which don't show the whole room, but it looks like you have the ability to flip the speakers to the wall where the component rack is and vice versa. It also looks like you could move the sofa that is currently in front of the speakers to the space opposite the wall where the equipment rack currently is. I would try that no matter what you use on the walls, but even if you don't move anything (I would move the sofa from in front of the speakers no matter what) in my experience the best thing to use behind the speakers is the DHDI ZR Acoustics panels (see the thread "Trying the ZR Acoustics Panels" at this forum). In my experience they are superior to all conventional room treatments - absorbers, diffusors, and traps. Since the best sound with the DHDI ZR panels comes from having the speakers right up against them their use also saves you space. Note also that since the ZR panels treat all frequencies you might not need the tube traps with them, or at least not as many. Put the ZR panels in floater frames and hang them like a piece of art. Then you can put them up when you listen and take them down if your better half doesn't want to look at them. Note however that the "Sample Rate" panels are attractive enough that she might be OK with leaving them up (see photos):
Right of the listening position we have the dining table and thereafter the kitchen. From wall to wall 13 meter.

In theory yes it’s possible to move the loudspeakers. In practical no. It’s a combined living room / listening room. My wife would never accept that and it would with our furniture not look nice. The loudspeakers need to stay where there are.

For me the question is “what is the best to use to temporary fill up the holes on the front wall“. Absorber, Diffuser or a combined Diffuser/Absorber. I would guess diffuser next to the left speaker. Behind the right speaker I don’t know.

I have read the ZR panels tread but I understand just sold in US.
 

Cellcbern

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Right of the listening position we have the dining table and thereafter the kitchen. From wall to wall 13 meter.

In theory yes it’s possible to move the loudspeakers. In practical no. It’s a combined living room / listening room. My wife would never accept that and it would with our furniture not look nice. The loudspeakers need to stay where there are.

For me the question is “what is the best to use to temporary fill up the holes on the front wall“. Absorber, Diffuser or a combined Diffuser/Absorber. I would guess diffuser next to the left speaker. Behind the right speaker I don’t know.

I have read the ZR panels tread but I understand just sold in US.
From the DHDI website "Q & A" section:

"ZR Acoustics® designs and products are available worldwide. Currently there are studio projects across many countries with ZR Technology driving the acoustic signature. Architectural Acoustic designs with ZR Permanent Construction can be managed remotely or in person, regardless of locale. ZR Products are easily shipped anywhere using our conscious logistics team and customer support system. Regardless of location, DHDI can handle transportation, customs, logistics and shipping door to door.
For shipping quotes on ZR Devices to international destinations please contact us directly".
 

benito

Well-Known Member
Jul 23, 2018
45
22
65
France
From the DHDI website "Q & A" section:

"ZR Acoustics® designs and products are available worldwide. Currently there are studio projects across many countries with ZR Technology driving the acoustic signature. Architectural Acoustic designs with ZR Permanent Construction can be managed remotely or in person, regardless of locale. ZR Products are easily shipped anywhere using our conscious logistics team and customer support system. Regardless of location, DHDI can handle transportation, customs, logistics and shipping door to door.
For shipping quotes on ZR Devices to international destinations please contact us directly".
I have been in contact with DHDI: for the international, they use the domestic prices. After oversea shipping cost + import taxes and VTA, the price is at least 50 % more than the domestic ones.
 

scot

Well-Known Member
Jan 4, 2018
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Hi sel53

I have a dedicated 2 channel only listening room tha measures 17’ front to rear wall by 12’ wide with an 8’ ceiling with wall to wall carpeting. I’ve been trying various acoustic treatment options for about 5 years. All of my comments apply only to what I hear in my room.

To answer your original question, when I installed QRD bamboo diffusers on the wall behind the speakers, it cleaned up the midrange and the high frequencies. Instruments were no longer jumbled together. Much less confusion. Voices were more articulate and I now found it easier to understand the words. The midrange & high frequencies were more open and I noticed the highs seemed to be better extended.

In my experience, there seems to be areas that are more important than others and this is where I would start.

1. Bass traps in the corners behind the speakers.

Before I added those, my room had no bass. I would spend stupid amounts money on speakers and couldn’t figure out why I had no bass. It took a couple of years to realize that the room had really bad nodes that would just eat up the bass. The bass traps helped a lot. I have them from floor to ceiling, bass problem solved!

2. The diffusers on the wall behind the speakers, in the middle.

These made a significant difference. Everything was cleaner, with noticeably better clarity. Soundstage was wider and deeper. Smaller background details that I didn’t even know were in the recoding were now revealed. Complex orchestral passages were much less confused.

3. Absorbent panels 1’ - 2’ on the side walls (if there are walls to the side of the speakers) in front of the speakers.

The purpose of these panels is to kill that first reflection bouncing off the walls in front of each speaker. This improves image specificity. Instruments within the soundstage are more stable. Again, everything is less confused.

I would also recommend playing with the placement of your listening chair by moving it closer to or farther away from the speakers. This can make a surprising difference.

The most important advise I could give you is don’t overdamp the room. This is easy to do. This will render the room dead, dull & lifeless. The only way to avoid that is to add small amounts of each option and then listen. Take your time and listen before adding more. If you’re convinced you’re going in the right direction, then add a little bit more. Again, listen carefully. If it starts to sound worse, you know you’ve added too much. Go back and take out that last bit. A properly treated room will have great energy and the music will come to life. Trust your ears, when it’s right, you’ll know it.

IMHO, the two most important things for great sound is the room and the setup. You can spend a lot of money on great components and put them in a bad room and if they are not setup properly, they will never sound good. You can buy more modestly priced gear and put it in a properly treated room and set up the gear correctly and it will sound great.

I hope these suggestions help you. Take care.

Best regards
Scot
 
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  • What’s Best Forum is THE forum for high end audio, product reviews, advice and sharing experiences on the best of everything else. This is THE place where audiophiles and audio companies discuss vintage, contemporary and new audio products, music servers, music streamers, computer audio, digital-to-analog converters, turntables, phono stages, cartridges, reel-to-reel tape machines, speakers, headphones and tube and solid-state amplification. Founded in 2010 What’s Best Forum invites intelligent and courteous people of all interests and backgrounds to describe and discuss the best of everything. From beginners to life-long hobbyists to industry professionals, we enjoy learning about new things and meeting new people, and participating in spirited debates.

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Steve Williams
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Ron Resnick
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