Standardization And The Use Of Audyssey

Gedlee

WBF Technical Expert
Jul 21, 2010
364
0
0
Novi, MI
#1
Markus

Agreed. But what to do in the situation where these approaches are not used? Its important to know where the technology should go, but its just as important to deal with it as it exists today. I would seriously doubt that "standardization" will ever happen.
 
#3
Standardization does happen right now. Audyssey already made it into mixing facilities.
I don't think you can make standards that easy, of course you can make recommendations. Psychoacoustics is not an easy field and you can't have reliable measurements of what's audible or not, disappointing or pleasant. I also think that DSP is not a good idea to deal with reflections as they are highly dependent on position and miking. Measuring with a dummy shows you how difficult are things in real world.
 
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markus

New Member
Jan 18, 2011
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0
#4
I don't think you can make standards that easy, of course you can make recommendations. Psychoacoustics is not an easy field and you can't have reliable measurements of what's audible or not, disappointing or pleasant. I also think that DSP is not a good idea to deal with reflections as they are highly dependent on position and miking. Measuring with a dummy shows you how difficult are things in real world.
Audyssey aligns sound reproduction conditions of control rooms and domestic listening spaces as close as it can. This is something that has NEVER happened before in audio history. It's debateable if their algorithm is "right" but do you know what MultEQ really does? I read their papers but they don't disclose the underlying psychoacoustic assumptions. Nevertheless it's undeniable that Audyssey started a standardization process.
 
#5
Audyssey aligns sound reproduction conditions of control rooms and domestic listening spaces as close as it can. This is something that has NEVER happened before in audio history. It's debateable if their algorithm is "right" but do you know what MultEQ really does?
No I don't, but I'll be glad to hear what's that thing never done before.
 
#7
1. Automated reference level calibration
2. Equal loudness compensation
3. Automated timbre matching
4. Automated room/speaker correction
I'm sorry I don't understand anything...
1. Reference level? Like Katz's K System?
2. You mean it does an equalization according to Fletcher-Munson curves? That would be terribly awful!
3. Timbre matching?? That means absolutely distortion free or what?
4. Room and speaker correction? There are some things you can't change by DSP and I don't think they are doing anything different than a FIR or IIR

Anyway, a Standard should give you a level of requirements to make you know if you're compliant or not and I haven't heard any of them.
 

markus

New Member
Jan 18, 2011
44
0
0
#8
This discussion is pretty far off topic so the mods might want to move it to a new thread...

I'm sorry I don't understand anything...
1. Reference level? Like Katz's K System?
Don't know what the K System does but Bob's reference level is derived from the reference level as defined by the movie industry. Audyssey uses that too.

2. You mean it does an equalization according to Fletcher-Munson curves? That would be terribly awful!
No, because those curves and those from ISO 226:2003 are based on pure tones and not on complex signals like music or speech. The curves used by Audyssey are derived from their own research. Equal-loudness compensation is vital for accurate sound reproduction.

3. Timbre matching?? That means absolutely distortion free or what?
No, that simply means aligning the in-room response to a predefined curve.

4. Room and speaker correction? There are some things you can't change by DSP and I don't think they are doing anything different than a FIR or IIR
Send me your email via PM if you're interested in papers.

Anyway, a Standard should give you a level of requirements to make you know if you're compliant or not and I haven't heard any of them.
Audyssey creates a de facto standard by applying the same rules to content creation and sound reproduction.
 

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