Record Racks

MylesBAstor

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
11,222
3
38
#1
Figuratively and literally hit the wall in terms of record (and tape) storage space. Just ordered 10 finished cherry wood record crates including base and top from Tony's Woodworking. If all goes well, should have them in about two or so weeks! Now will have a space for those homeless records (and yes, going to start pruning a few too!).

Here's a link for those interested in some inexpensive solutions other than milk crates that I've found!

http://www.tonyswoodshop.com/

What's everyone else using to store their software?
 
#2
Figuratively and literally hit the wall in terms of record (and tape) storage space. Just ordered 10 finished cherry wood record crates including base and top from Tony's Woodworking. If all goes well, should have them in about two or so weeks! Now will have a space for those homeless records (and yes, going to start pruning a few too!).

Here's a link for those interested in some inexpensive solutions other than milk crates that I've found!

http://www.tonyswoodshop.com/

What's everyone else using to store their software?
Hi Myles,

I am using these finished in a teak finish, but I do not have nearly as large a vinyl collection as some:

http://www.gothiccabinetcraft.com/products/LP-Record-Tower%2C-6-Shelf-w%7B47%7D-Base-.html



I have to figure something out for R2R.

Rich
 
Aug 31, 2012
68
6
8
N. CA
#3
13 foot long wall of Metro-rack from my favorite industrial supply McMaster Carr & Co. Their order desk is open 24/7...... the temptation is huge.

Cyclotronguy
 

Johnny Vinyl

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
May 16, 2010
8,572
7
38
Calgary, AB
#4
IKEA EXPIDIT....cheap, but functional.
 

treitz3

Super Moderator
#5
Hello, Myles. I just so happen to use the same thing as John does. The IKEA EXPIDIT in black. Definitely a low cost item and they both look great in the house. My wife even approved and she's a very picky interior designer. With that said, I have not had enough time with them to determine the effects of long term usage with such weight. IIRC, I have had them about a year and they look as good as the day they were bought with no warping of the shelves. With the people I inquired about this product before I bought them, they didn't experience any abnormalities from the weight either. In fact, many of the photos revealed that I was pretty much a lightweight when it came to my vinyl collection.

Time to get crackin'....:)

Tom
 

Johnny Vinyl

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
May 16, 2010
8,572
7
38
Calgary, AB
#7
Tom - I've had mine for well over 5 years and no issues at all. They look as good as the day I bought them. I'm about to purchase another one on the weekend.
 

slowGEEZR

Member Sponsor
Sep 20, 2010
1,265
1
38
67
Round Rock, Texas
#8
I've had my Expidits for a few years now and like John, no issues at all. It is very important to use them in the vertical orientation, as the shelves are designed to hold the weight in that orientation. I also recommend using the wall anchors! This pic shows two used for record storage and one, in the horizontal position, used for holding supplies and other stuff.

DSC00114-M.jpg
 

Johnny Vinyl

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
May 16, 2010
8,572
7
38
Calgary, AB
#9
SlowGEEZR - Absolutely correct. DO NOT STACK them. At least not the 2x4. And don't use the 4x4 ones.
 
Jun 22, 2012
547
9
18
New England
#10
What's wrong with using a single 2x4 horizontally (no stacking)? I've had 2 full ones for years and even after moving and closely inspecting the shelves with a digital level they were still level with no sag.
 
Jul 23, 2012
99
0
6
Southwestern Ontario
#11
shelves.jpg

Here is my record rack. The shelving material was on sale, total of $74.00 and 3 hours work invested. Only problem I’m almost out of room!
 

treitz3

Super Moderator
#12
Here is my record rack. The shelving material was on sale, total of $74.00 and 3 hours work invested. Only problem I’m almost out of room!
Hello, jn229 and welcome to the WBF. I love your idea with using the LP's as you did. Very clever.

Tom
 

Joe Galbraith

Senior Member/Sponsor
Apr 23, 2010
214
0
0
www.arsetmusica.com
#15

sombunya

New Member
Oct 18, 2012
94
0
0
#16
I went with a system my buddy came up with. He used to move around a lot and needed a way to easily move them without packing and unpacking them. They are essentially boxes that can be stacked in any arrangement to accommodate any area.

Here is a pic of a box for my 7 inch vinyl:
DSC01784.jpg

The tops and back are three pieces of 8 inch by 24 inch long. The dividers are 7 inch wide by 8 inch tall, all 1/2 inch thick. Because the top and bottom is 8 inches wide the vinyl does not hang out past the edge.
DSC01786-1.jpg

If you pick up the box by the lip on the top (or bottom), you can turn it on it's back and stack them for transport if necessary without crushing the contents.

I made boxes for my 12 inchers first so I was sort of developing the sizes needed. The tops and bottoms are 14 inch wide by 23 inch long, 3/4 inch thick. The backs are 15 inch tall by 21 1/4 long so they overlap the top and bottom pieces for strength, 1/2 inch thick. The dividers are 14 inch by 14 inch, 1/2 inch thick. The joints where the sides attach to the top were rabbited, glued and screwed. (my pal glued and clamped only for appearance) Glued and clamped only is probably plenty strong. I did the rabbit joints myself on a table saw after the pieces were cut-to-size. They may not be necessary but probably add a lot of strength.
DSC01791-1-1.jpg

I made a bunch of boxes for my CD's as well.
DSC01787-1.jpg

Advantages of this system are you can stack them any way you like and pile lots of garbage on top or place equipment on top.
DSC01789.jpg

The disadvantages are the higher you go, the less stable the arrangement becomes. Not so much a problem with wider LP boxes but my CD bowes are actually anchored at various points with small hooks and stainless tie wire. When I stacked them I offset the boxes to add a bit of stability.


They can be assembled easily with simple hand tools. The cost may seem a bit high but once they're made they're done forever.

Also, I was involved in the plywood and furniture industry for quite a while so I had some connections. This is important; I had the wood cut for me by a professional. Small time furniture company but he had some righteously top-of-the-line computerized panel saws. The cuts he made were razor sharp and the pieces were absolutely square. Also, because he cuts truckloads of wood he had plenty of inventory. The local HOME DEPOT was charging $26 for a 1/2"x4'x8' sheet of Mahogany. The shop where I went charged me about $18 per sheet, cut to size. This particular shop did not advertise, of course, because the guy was a wholesale-only cutter/manufacturer.

My point is with a little bit of leg work and careful planning (try not to incorporate too many different sizes for each set of boxes) these can be made reasonably cheaply and the results are good. I even went so far as to buy the clear finish in a can and apply it with a brush. Much cheaper than spray cans. I then lightly hit them with 300 grit sandpaper, wiped with a damp cloth, good to go.

All of my best vinyl is packed in Japanese resealable sleeves. Everything else in poly sleeves. Slide them in and out, no shelf wear.
 

MylesBAstor

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
11,222
3
38
#17
I went with a system my buddy came up with. He used to move around a lot and needed a way to easily move them without packing and unpacking them. They are essentially boxes that can be stacked in any arrangement to accommodate any area.

Here is a pic of a box for my 7 inch vinyl:
View attachment 10455

The tops and back are three pieces of 8 inch by 24 inch long. The dividers are 7 inch wide by 8 inch tall, all 1/2 inch thick. Because the top and bottom is 8 inches wide the vinyl does not hang out past the edge.
View attachment 10456

If you pick up the box by the lip on the top (or bottom), you can turn it on it's back and stack them for transport if necessary without crushing the contents.

I made boxes for my 12 inchers first so I was sort of developing the sizes needed. The tops and bottoms are 14 inch wide by 23 inch long, 3/4 inch thick. The backs are 15 inch tall by 21 1/4 long so they overlap the top and bottom pieces for strength, 1/2 inch thick. The dividers are 14 inch by 14 inch, 1/2 inch thick. The joints where the sides attach to the top were rabbited, glued and screwed. (my pal glued and clamped only for appearance) Glued and clamped only is probably plenty strong. I did the rabbit joints myself on a table saw after the pieces were cut-to-size. They may not be necessary but probably add a lot of strength.
View attachment 10457

I made a bunch of boxes for my CD's as well.
View attachment 10458

Advantages of this system are you can stack them any way you like and pile lots of garbage on top or place equipment on top.
View attachment 10459

The disadvantages are the higher you go, the less stable the arrangement becomes. Not so much a problem with wider LP boxes but my CD bowes are actually anchored at various points with small hooks and stainless tie wire. When I stacked them I offset the boxes to add a bit of stability.


They can be assembled easily with simple hand tools. The cost may seem a bit high but once they're made they're done forever.

Also, I was involved in the plywood and furniture industry for quite a while so I had some connections. This is important; I had the wood cut for me by a professional. Small time furniture company but he had some righteously top-of-the-line computerized panel saws. The cuts he made were razor sharp and the pieces were absolutely square. Also, because he cuts truckloads of wood he had plenty of inventory. The local HOME DEPOT was charging $26 for a 1/2"x4'x8' sheet of Mahogany. The shop where I went charged me about $18 per sheet, cut to size. This particular shop did not advertise, of course, because the guy was a wholesale-only cutter/manufacturer.

My point is with a little bit of leg work and careful planning (try not to incorporate too many different sizes for each set of boxes) these can be made reasonably cheaply and the results are good. I even went so far as to buy the clear finish in a can and apply it with a brush. Much cheaper than spray cans. I then lightly hit them with 300 grit sandpaper, wiped with a damp cloth, good to go.

All of my best vinyl is packed in Japanese resealable sleeves. Everything else in poly sleeves. Slide them in and out, no shelf wear.
Very cool and thanks for sharing. Don't see any homeless records there :)
 
Jan 23, 2012
577
0
16
Philly
#18
These pics look like something posted by Vinyl Keeper.
 

Peter Breuninger

[Industry Expert] Member Sponsor
Jul 20, 2010
1,231
0
0
#19
Ikea resurrected IVAR several years ago and I grabbed a bunch.
 

Bill Hart

Active Member
May 11, 2012
2,592
0
36
#20
I have a mish-mash of heavy duty wooden shelves, some custom made, some I bought back in the early 90's at Ikea that are very sturdy-basically thick black wood planks with a "T" shaped vertical riser that allows you to stack them (though I keep mine low). I'm running out of space, have some records in storage in NY and others in storage now in Tx.
I really, really hate having to look at spines to find stuff. Ideally, I'd like to have floor to ceiling shelves built, but also have old-fashioned record store style bins for the stuff 'in rotation.' It will be a design exercise to get it to look right. I don't like fancy furniture finishes, and also don't like cheap looking stuff (somehow, the Ikea shelving, though dirt cheap, has served me well because it doesn't look cheesy). I do know some furniture designers -maybe I'll pick their brains for some ideas at some point. Any thoughts welcome.
I always wanted a library rail and ladder as part of floor to ceiling shelving, so integrating that with bins will be interesting. :)
 

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