Recent Concerts You've Enjoyed

Hi-FiGuy

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Feb 24, 2015
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The 4th of July shindig at my daughters employer. Two very good local bands sharing one incredible drummer, playing mostly cover tunes. Been a long time since I have been in the presence of live music and with the weather being perfect and cold beer in my hand it was pretty much a perfect evening.
 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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The Rolling Stones Sept 26 St. Louis

In June, When I heard the Rolling Stones were going to resume their canceled US Tour beginning in last night in St. Louis, I bought tickets immediately. I have never seen them live, and figured I better do so now before one of them dies. Sadly, it was a prescient decision due to the passing of Charlie Watts last month. Last night, I was privileged to see one of the greatest musical spectacles of my life. I lived in St. Louis from 1990-2003 and hadn’t been back since. Happy to be back in STL and staying with friends, we headed off to see the Stones. The concert was in the Dome at America's Center and I couldn’t believe it was the same place I watched the Ram’s play in their great Superbowl years here with Kurt Warner and the Greatest Show on Turf.

Every aspect of the evening was eye opening. To begin, we weaved our way into the building through the back of the venue where we passed the 50 tractor trailers that routinely carry the tour.


1.jpeg

2.jpeg

It’s hard to understand why a small army of vehicles is necessary to transport the gear for a tour of this magnitude- until you see the stage.

3.jpeg

The logistics of setting up a production like this are intimidating. Every part of the ginormous stage is labeled, set up and disassembled according to a precise plan for every arena on the tour. It must take dozens of people to manage this feat with a variety of technical crew people and roadies. The stage and the entire audio-visual production was first rate and is surely a high water mark for rock and roll concerts in the current age. The sound was, well, loud. Duh. But I was so engrossed in the concert that I forgot to take out my trusty SPL meter on the iPhone! Nobody should ever attend a concert like this without earplugs. I have a collection of many, but I find that simple tissue, lightly moistened, can be put in the ear canal with just the right density and location to allow an adequate bandwidth for complete musical enjoyment while preventing potential damage from peaks that I’m sure were over 110dB (which is typical for a rock concert these days. Springsteen hit that easily at Meadowlands a few years ago.)

As far as the performance itself, all I can say is wowza. To begin, it is instantly apparent that you are witnessing a performance by an entertainer that defies description because Jagger is simply not human. No mere mortal, 78 years old, should be able to do what this guy does. Not only is his voice in excellent form, but the prancing, preening, strutting and the total energy is so off the charts that it needs to be seen to be believed. When watching Jagger, you can't help realize you are watching a legend because he is more than one of the high priests of R&R. In fact, he is and one if its greatest prophets. And then you realize- he’s a freakin' great grandfather!! How could I be seeing what I’m seeing? It can’t be real. But it is. This sort of showmanship and talent comes along so rarely. How rare? Well, if Tom Brady plays football at 78 like he does now, only then can you make a meaningful comparisons! Until then, Brady is human, Jagger is just... not. They did 19 songs in about 2 ¼ hours and I was exhausted just from watching and dancing in my seat. Again, that Jagger did this without requiring an IV and a trip the hospital is just astonishing. Somebody read that during a typical performance, he covers about 3-4 miles on stage. I'm not surprised.

When watching Jagger the performer it’s easy to forget he has other talents that include playing the harmonica and the guitar, both of which he did several times during the show. Especially easy to forget or take for granted is that he not only performs the songs, but he wrote virtually all of them as well! The team of Jagger and Richards is one of the most accomplished in the history of R&R with Jagger writing most of the lyrics and Richards the music, although they have reversed roles on some songs. They consider themselves a songwriting team (they referred to themselves by their pseudonym, The Glimmer Twins) with a catalogue of incredible commercial hits over 5 decades.

Two other take-aways. First, I finally figured out why Keith Richards (also 78) isn’t dead! Despite all the abuse he is known to have endured (mostly self-afflicted) I really think the main reason that he isn’t dead yet is because, quite simply, he loves what he does! And which he’s damned good at! This guy smiles so much and so often on stage that you can see he is just having a grand old time, which I'm convinced is why he has defeated the grim reaper for so long. The second take away is that I never appreciated how integral and important Ron Woods ( a mere "kid" at 74) is to the sound of the Stones. His contribution is far easier to appreciate live than through regular listening at home. Forget “you are there” vs “they are here” comparisons. When you get to “you and they are truly in the same room”, there’s a level of appreciation for all the members that just can’t be equaled any other way. Nor would you want it to be. It’s what live music is all about.

When they finally left the stage with images of Charlie Watts hanging on the screens overhead after they paid their deep respect, we were left in somber mourning as well, all the while knowing that hope really does spring eternal as evidenced by the incredible music they just played and the joy it generated.

Two years of summer concerts were lost to COVID. The Stones concert reminded me of just how great a loss that was. I sure hope we are moving past that as soon as possible. Next up are concerts by Steely Dan next month, and another high priest and prophet, the great Billy Joel at the Garden in January. Add to those the resumption of Carnegie (Yuja Wang - I'm coming for you, baby!) and the NY Phil seasons after a year and half of silence, and things really are looking up!
 
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Addicted to hifi

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The Rolling Stones Sept 26 St. Louis

In June, When I heard the Rolling Stones were going to resume their canceled US Tour beginning in last night in St. Louis, I bought tickets immediately. I have never seen them live, and figured I better do so now before one of them dies. Sadly, it was a prescient decision due to the passing of Charlie Watts last month. Last night, I was privileged to see one of the greatest musical spectacles of my life. I lived in St. Louis from 1990-2003 and hadn’t been back since. Happy to be back in STL and staying with friends, we headed off to see the Stones. The concert was in the Dome at America's Center and I couldn’t believe it was the same place I watched the Ram’s play in their great Superbowl years here with Kurt Warner and the Greatest Show on Turf.

Every aspect of the evening was eye opening. To begin, we weaved our way into the building through the back of the venue where we passed the 50 tractor trailers that routinely carry the tour.


View attachment 82308

View attachment 82309

It’s hard to understand why a small army of vehicles is necessary to transport the gear for a tour of this magnitude- until you see the stage.

View attachment 82310

The logistics of setting up a production like this are intimidating. Every part of the ginormous stage is labeled, set up and disassembled according to a precise plan for every arena on the tour. It must take dozens of people to manage this feat with a variety of technical crew people and roadies. All I can say is that I’m convinced the Stones crew could have gotten us out of Afghanistan far more efficiently than the folks we had on the ground there that tried so hard but stumbled. The stage and the entire audio-visual production was first rate and is surely a high water mark for rock and roll concerts in the current age. The sound was, well, loud. Duh. But I was so engrossed in the concert that I forgot to take out my trusty /SPL meter on the iphone! Nobody should ever attend a concert like this without earplugs. I have a collection of many, but I find that simple tissue, lightly moistened, can be put in the ear canal with just the right density and location to allow an adequate bandwidth for complete musical enjoyment while preventing potential damage from peaks that I’m sure were over 110dB (which is typical for a rock concert these days. Springsteen hit that easily at Meadowlands a few years ago.)

As far as the performance itself, all I can say is wowza. To begin, it is instantly apparent that you are witnessing a performance by an entertainer that defies description because Jagger is simply not human. No mere mortal, 78 years old, should be able to do what this guy does. Not only is his voice in excellent form, but the prancing, preening, strutting and the total energy is so off the charts that it needs to be seen to be believed. When watching Jagger, you can't help realize you are watching a legend because he is more than one of the high priests of R&R. In fact, he is and one if its greatest prophets. And then you realize- he’s a freakin' great grandfather!! How could I be seeing what I’m seeing? It can’t be real. But it is. This sort of showmanship and talent comes along so rarely. How rare? Well, if Tom Brady plays football at 78 like he does now, only then can you make a meaningful comparisons! Until then, Brady is human, Jagger is just... not. They did 19 songs in about 2 ¼ hours and I was exhausted just from watching and dancing in my seat. Again, that Jagger did this without requiring an IV and a trip the hospital is just astonishing. Somebody read that during a typical performance, he covers about 3-4 miles on stage. I'm not surprised.

When watching Jagger the performer it’s easy to forget he his other talents that include playing the harmonica and the guitar, both of which he did several times during the show. Especially easy to forget or take for granted is that he not only performs the songs, but he wrote virtually all of them as well! The team of Jagger and Richards is one of the most accomplished in the history of R&R with Jagger writing most of the lyrics and Richards the music, although they have reversed roles on some songs. They consider themselves a songwriting team (they referred to themselves by their pseudonym, The Glimmer Twins) with a catalogue of incredible commercial hits over 5 decades.

Two other take-aways. First, I finally figured out why Keith Richards (also 78) isn’t dead! Despite all the abuse he is known to have endured (mostly self-afflicted) I really think that he isn’t dead yet is because, quite simply, he loves what he does! And which he’s damned good at! This guy smiles so much and so often on stage that you can see he is just having a grand old time, which I'm convinced is why he has defeated the grim reaper for so long. The second take away is that I never appreciated how integral and important Ron Woods ( a mere "kid" at 74) is to the sound of the Stones. His contribution is far easier to appreciate live than through regular listening at home. Forget “you are there” vs “they are here” comparisons. When you get to “you and they are truly in the same room”, there’s a level of appreciation for all the members that just can’t be equaled any other way. Nor would you want it to be. It’s what live music is all about.

When they finally left the stage with images of Charlie Watts hanging on the screens overhead after they paid their deep respect, we were left in somber mourning as well, all the while knowing that hope really does spring eternal as evidenced by the incredible music they just played and the joy it generated.

Two years of summer concerts were lost to COVID. The Stones concert reminded me of just how great a loss that was. I sure hope we are moving past that as soon as possible. Next up are concerts by Steely Dan next month, and another high priest and prophet, the great Billy Joel at the Garden in January. Add to those the resumption of Carnegie (Yuja Wang - I'm coming for you, baby!) and the NY Phil seasons after a year and half of silence, and things really are looking up!
the stones are one of my favourite groups of all time.
 

Ron Resnick

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Jan 25, 2015
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What a wonderful and exciting report, Marty! You almost made us feel like we joined you!
 

Al M.

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Sep 10, 2013
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Greater Boston
The Rolling Stones Sept 26 St. Louis

In June, When I heard the Rolling Stones were going to resume their canceled US Tour beginning in last night in St. Louis, I bought tickets immediately. I have never seen them live, and figured I better do so now before one of them dies. Sadly, it was a prescient decision due to the passing of Charlie Watts last month. Last night, I was privileged to see one of the greatest musical spectacles of my life. I lived in St. Louis from 1990-2003 and hadn’t been back since. Happy to be back in STL and staying with friends, we headed off to see the Stones. The concert was in the Dome at America's Center and I couldn’t believe it was the same place I watched the Ram’s play in their great Superbowl years here with Kurt Warner and the Greatest Show on Turf.

Every aspect of the evening was eye opening. To begin, we weaved our way into the building through the back of the venue where we passed the 50 tractor trailers that routinely carry the tour.


View attachment 82308

View attachment 82309

It’s hard to understand why a small army of vehicles is necessary to transport the gear for a tour of this magnitude- until you see the stage.

View attachment 82310

The logistics of setting up a production like this are intimidating. Every part of the ginormous stage is labeled, set up and disassembled according to a precise plan for every arena on the tour. It must take dozens of people to manage this feat with a variety of technical crew people and roadies. All I can say is that I’m convinced the Stones crew could have gotten us out of Afghanistan far more efficiently than the folks we had on the ground there that tried so hard but stumbled. The stage and the entire audio-visual production was first rate and is surely a high water mark for rock and roll concerts in the current age. The sound was, well, loud. Duh. But I was so engrossed in the concert that I forgot to take out my trusty /SPL meter on the iphone! Nobody should ever attend a concert like this without earplugs. I have a collection of many, but I find that simple tissue, lightly moistened, can be put in the ear canal with just the right density and location to allow an adequate bandwidth for complete musical enjoyment while preventing potential damage from peaks that I’m sure were over 110dB (which is typical for a rock concert these days. Springsteen hit that easily at Meadowlands a few years ago.)

As far as the performance itself, all I can say is wowza. To begin, it is instantly apparent that you are witnessing a performance by an entertainer that defies description because Jagger is simply not human. No mere mortal, 78 years old, should be able to do what this guy does. Not only is his voice in excellent form, but the prancing, preening, strutting and the total energy is so off the charts that it needs to be seen to be believed. When watching Jagger, you can't help realize you are watching a legend because he is more than one of the high priests of R&R. In fact, he is and one if its greatest prophets. And then you realize- he’s a freakin' great grandfather!! How could I be seeing what I’m seeing? It can’t be real. But it is. This sort of showmanship and talent comes along so rarely. How rare? Well, if Tom Brady plays football at 78 like he does now, only then can you make a meaningful comparisons! Until then, Brady is human, Jagger is just... not. They did 19 songs in about 2 ¼ hours and I was exhausted just from watching and dancing in my seat. Again, that Jagger did this without requiring an IV and a trip the hospital is just astonishing. Somebody read that during a typical performance, he covers about 3-4 miles on stage. I'm not surprised.

When watching Jagger the performer it’s easy to forget he his other talents that include playing the harmonica and the guitar, both of which he did several times during the show. Especially easy to forget or take for granted is that he not only performs the songs, but he wrote virtually all of them as well! The team of Jagger and Richards is one of the most accomplished in the history of R&R with Jagger writing most of the lyrics and Richards the music, although they have reversed roles on some songs. They consider themselves a songwriting team (they referred to themselves by their pseudonym, The Glimmer Twins) with a catalogue of incredible commercial hits over 5 decades.

Two other take-aways. First, I finally figured out why Keith Richards (also 78) isn’t dead! Despite all the abuse he is known to have endured (mostly self-afflicted) I really think that he isn’t dead yet is because, quite simply, he loves what he does! And which he’s damned good at! This guy smiles so much and so often on stage that you can see he is just having a grand old time, which I'm convinced is why he has defeated the grim reaper for so long. The second take away is that I never appreciated how integral and important Ron Woods ( a mere "kid" at 74) is to the sound of the Stones. His contribution is far easier to appreciate live than through regular listening at home. Forget “you are there” vs “they are here” comparisons. When you get to “you and they are truly in the same room”, there’s a level of appreciation for all the members that just can’t be equaled any other way. Nor would you want it to be. It’s what live music is all about.

When they finally left the stage with images of Charlie Watts hanging on the screens overhead after they paid their deep respect, we were left in somber mourning as well, all the while knowing that hope really does spring eternal as evidenced by the incredible music they just played and the joy it generated.

Two years of summer concerts were lost to COVID. The Stones concert reminded me of just how great a loss that was. I sure hope we are moving past that as soon as possible. Next up are concerts by Steely Dan next month, and another high priest and prophet, the great Billy Joel at the Garden in January. Add to those the resumption of Carnegie (Yuja Wang - I'm coming for you, baby!) and the NY Phil seasons after a year and half of silence, and things really are looking up!

Great report, Marty. I saw them 1995 in Cologne, Germany, in an open air stadium. It was just like you said, the energy of Mick Jagger on stage was unbelievable. Then he was 25 years younger, but even then it was incredible. Two hours non stop of not just singing, but constantly running around the stage in the most entertaining way, and fully in service of the music. The band was in top form too.

The sound at that concert was the best rock concert sound that I have ever heard live. Nothing else even came close -- ever. So clear and undistorted (except the distortion from the instruments of course), while effortlessly loud and powerful in a huge open air stadium. Incredible.
 

Ultrafast69

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Aug 28, 2018
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Great narrative for one of the top bands out there. It’s hard not to associate their music with some point of your life, rebellious in my case.
 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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Oh, I forgot to mention, if acting 1/3rd his age on stage at age 78 isn't enough to impress, recall that Jagger had open heart surgery to replace his aortic valve in April 2020. Unreal.
 

musicfirst1

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Philharmonie de Paris playing Mahlers 2nd symphony 'Resurrection' at the Symponhie de Paris on September 25th 2021.
A 90 piece orchestra and a 90 voice choir, with 2 soloists and full pipe organ with 32 foot pipes.
We were row J centre, where I took this picture.

There are absolutely no systems that can even remotely come close to this absolute sound....
A very special, very humbling experience.o_O
I always look forward to recalibrating my ears at the best halls in the world, even though I'm not a classical savant.
I've also heard performances at Carnegie Hall, The Royal Albert, the Concertgbouw, Boston Symphony Hall and the Musikverein in Vienna.
I think the best sound I've heard was here in Paris. They even have anterooms off the wings were some of the orchestra played to a very ethereal effect.

As for realistic audio reproduction in the home, I Guess I'll just stick to Jazz..:)
 

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morricab

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Apr 25, 2014
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Philharmonie de Paris playing Mahlers 2nd symphony 'Resurrection' at the Symponhie de Paris on September 25th 2021.
A 90 piece orchestra and a 90 voice choir, with 2 soloists and full pipe organ with 32 foot pipes.
We were row J centre, where I took this picture.

There are absolutely no systems that can even remotely come close to this absolute sound....
A very special, very humbling experience.o_O
I always look forward to recalibrating my ears at the best halls in the world, even though I'm not a classical savant.
I've also heard performances at Carnegie Hall, The Royal Albert, the Concertgbouw, Boston Symphony Hall and the Musikverein in Vienna.
I think the best sound I've heard was here in Paris. They even have anterooms off the wings were some of the orchestra played to a very ethereal effect.

As for realistic audio reproduction in the home, I Guess I'll just stick to Jazz..:)
Exactly what I have said here many times. I have realized that realistic full orchestra at true concert levels at home is not attainable, IMO. I concentrate on getting it right for trios, quartets, duos, vocalists and jazz recordings. Essentially chamber music for classical and small Jazz ensembles/folk etc. Power rock sounds so different recorded to live that it is unlikely to ever really sound like live just from the drastic difference in production values vs. a live mixed sound.
 

jazdoc

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Aug 7, 2010
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Exactly what I have said here many times. I have realized that realistic full orchestra at true concert levels at home is not attainable, IMO. I concentrate on getting it right for trios, quartets, duos, vocalists and jazz recordings. Essentially chamber music for classical and small Jazz ensembles/folk etc. Power rock sounds so different recorded to live that it is unlikely to ever really sound like live just from the drastic difference in production values vs. a live mixed sound.
After a few abortive attempts, went to my first live show since March 2020: Immanuel Wilkens quartet at Langston Hughes Hall in Seattle as part of Earshot Jazz Festival. The concert was spectacular.

Also a humbling reminder that even the best stereo systems pale in comparison to the real thing.
 

ACHiPo

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Feb 22, 2015
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Saw Robert Cray at a small-ish local venue (500 seats). It was so great to see live music again, and I forgot I was wearing a mask several times! Masking up is a small price to pay to be able to hear and see live music!
 

jazdoc

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Aug 7, 2010
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Heard the young vocalist Samara Joy with pianist Sullivan Fortner last evening. Young lady is going to be a star. Ordered her debut LP when I got home...

 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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Steely Dan
Nov 6, 2021

It is so nice to go and see live music again. Last night, Steely Dan performed their “greatest hits” as part of a 4 night residency at the Mayo Art Center in Morristown, NJ. (The other 3 nights they performed Royal Scam, Gaucho, and Aja in their entirety). They played to a sold-out crowd in a wonderful 1300 seat community venue about an hour west of Manhattan. Fagen (in sunglasses behind the organ keyboard) is a local NJ boy who grew up not far away in Passaic, NJ, so even his sarcastic “where else would I rather be tonight?” comment from the stage was greeted by wild howling. This was his crowd for sure.

IMG_3626.jpg

One thing you can be certain of when attending a Steely Dan concert is that the musicianship will be of the highest order, and it certainly was. It is well known that Fagen and his co-founder Walter Becker (who died in 2017 from esophogeal cancer) have always had the highest production values on their recordings. In addition, the studio musicians and band members who have worked with them are always first rate. (One could easily say that Chevy Chase, who played drums for them in one of their earliest bands, was a rare exception!). It was also a pleasure to go to a rock concert that didn’t require the use of earplugs. The sound and mix were, not surprising, exceptional and the large band performance and solos were superb. This is basically big band jazz music with a rock groove. Steely Dan has always featured horns and they were in fine form tonight. It didn’t hurt that they were joined on stage for this gig by the talented and gorgeous jazz baritone sax player, Lauren Sevian, who I’ve seen several times at Birdland as part of the Mingus and house Big Band and who I’ve had a crush on for years! I can’t say that Fagen sings as well now as he did in the past, but still, he was credible and enjoyable. His trio of excellent back-up singers helped covered a number of vocal “whoas” nicely from the aging virtuoso.

As I said, the music and musicianship was first rate. Steely Dan’s musical director and co-lead guitarist Jon Herrington has been with him for decades, and played essentially every riff that you know well from the recordings, almost to the letter. The other co-lead guitarist, a young kid also from NJ, Connor Kennedy, was equally superb and improvised with exceptional talent. The arrangements were spectacular and fiercely played. However, the musician of the night who drives the entire band was their drummer Keith Carlock, who is as good if not better than any rock drummer performing today. Fagen surrounds himself with the best and Carlock is certainly that. Fagen let him close the show with a solo that just rocked the rafters. Wowza.

A few reflections. When they played their opening number, Hey Nineteen, I looked around at this joyful audience and the first thing I said to my wife was “nobody here is 19 anymore”. In fact, there was not a person under 50 that I could see. This was absolutely a Medicare crowd. No doubt about it. They were surely the same crowd that attended Steely Dan concerts back in the day, but the big difference was that when we attended Steely Dan decades ago, we would stand up in our seats and dance our assess off. Not anymore. There were however, a lot of people that eventually stood up, but only to exit their seats as they came and went to the bathroom! I’m serious. Somebody needs to write a medical paper on “The effects on an aging prostate and bladder on bathroom activity at present day rock concerts”. This is a very real phenomenon! The good news is that when the band came out for their encore (Reelin’ in the Years), everybody finally stood and danced. More importantly, it seemed to me that everyone understood exactly what was happening. There was the look of pure joy on every face I saw because we all knew the passage of time is inevitable but our enjoyment tonight would not be denied.
 
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Audire

Well-Known Member
Jan 19, 2019
277
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S. FL
Jane Monheit performing in Naples, Fl just before the COVID lockdowns. She sounds better in person than on CD - don’t they all…. Glorious voice. One of the monitors went out briefly, she jokingly handled it well. Pleasant character on stage. A true artist.
 

jazdoc

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Thursday night heard Benny Green solo at Townhall

Friday night was a fundraiser for the South Hudson Project at The Royal Room. Great to hear Skerik again.
 

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morricab

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Apr 25, 2014
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Got to hear a live classical concert again indoors for the first time in around 2- years. We went to a family concert at the Tonhalle (now refurbished) in Zurich to hear The Adventures of Robinhood by Korngold. Fantastic sound and even though I sat in the back balcony it was crystal clear and hugely dynamic!
 

marty

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Apr 20, 2010
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Addendum to post #694
I was asked privately by some why I have a thing for Lauren Sevian. Aside from the fact that she plays a killer baritone sax, these might help you understand my crush


Sevian 2.png


Sevian 3.png
 

heihei

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2017
275
219
128
Tony Allen Retrospective at the Royal Festival Hall, London on Saturday - one of the best gigs I've ever been to, and certainly the best I've been to where I barely knew any of the music! Damon Albarn, Nitin Sawhney, Eska, Ezra Collective, Joan as Policewoman, Ben Okri. Just sensational.

Not sure Damon will be invited back to play the venue though - the bouncers didn't take kindly to him inviting the crowd onto the stage at the end!
 

jazdoc

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Love Joan as Policewoman!
 

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