New Dedicated Listening Room

Is this a perception of a single layer of drywall on a wood stud? Or 2 layers with the squares of adhesive backed damping material (forgot the brand) on metal channel.

I was watching a Audiphile Junkie video on Rhapsody in Dallas. He has multiple layers of 1/4" drywall with aluminum plate sandwiched inbetween. I'm not doing that either as aluminum plate is god awful expensive. I can hardly afford chunks I use on my boat to mount stuff. But I did wonder about 4 or more layers of 1/4" inch drywall compared to 2 of 1/2 or 5/8.

I'm sure I will feel very confused like Ron was when he started. People telling you do this and that and having to throttle them back to some degree. I have kept my eyes open for a while. No one pops as the definitive expert on room design for a 2 channel listening room. Lots of people are noted for recording rooms or theatre. And many are engaged in heroic efforts that cost more than my whole house. Im going to have maybe $40k to work this room over. I can only do so much.
 
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I tried reading Rons 5 favorite rooms. No info in there. Just noise. Anyhow. I sat and thought about what I have heard myself. I get the drywall having noise. I get how a cinder block would be different. I get how walls of records and shelves are a benefit. Makes me wonder about damping the drywall. And what does the screw and glue framing do. Also about using wall paper instead of paint. My wife wants to use wall paper somewhere in the house.
 
Is this a perception of a single layer of drywall on a wood stud? Or 2 layers with the squares of adhesive backed damping material (forgot the brand) on metal channel.

I was watching a Audiphile Junkie video on Rhapsody in Dallas. He has multiple layers of 1/4" drywall with aluminum plate sandwiched inbetween. I'm not doing that either as aluminum plate is god awful expensive. I can hardly afford chunks I use on my boat to mount stuff. But I did wonder about 4 or more layers of 1/4" inch drywall compared to 2 of 1/2 or 5/8.

I'm sure I will feel very confused like Ron was when he started. People telling you do this and that and having to throttle them back to some degree. I have kept my eyes open for a while. No one pops as the definitive expert on room design for a 2 channel listening room. Lots of people are noted for recording rooms or theatre. And many are engaged in heroic efforts that cost more than my whole house. Im going to have maybe $40k to work this room over. I can only do so much.
When I had a dedicated theater room in a house (years back), I used R-channel (resilient channel) for the drywall to decrease transmission of sound to other parts of the house. One effect of R-channel is that the sheet rock will flex and absorb (reduce) bass. The walls were insulated with rock wool, which is denser and more acoustically absorbent than regular insulation. We used 5/8 sheet rock on walls and ceiling since it was denser.

An optimal room dimensions for good sound, with minimal treatment, is a different animal. That's where a knowledgeable acoustics expert can help with the dimensions for the room and placement of speakers and listening position. Or, do enough research to do it on your own.

The house we live in now has optimal dimensions, but the sound travels everywhere. The room is 19 feet wide, 40 feet long and 11 feet high. The 40 foot length includes opening the doors to the bedrooms adjoining the listening rooms. Otherwise, the listening room would be 20 feet long. The room has an open stairway to the upper levels, so there is no practical way to seal if off. The stairway makes a superb bass port.

In other words - its two separate topics. One of optimal room size for optimal sound and minimizing treatments. Two is construction techniques and materials to isolate the room from external sound and minimize transmission of the sound to other parts of the house. There are a lot of choices, and many different products.

Good luck with build. Whatever you decide, we will be waiting for the electrical panel and distribution details!
 
Looking at flooring today I found this wood for walls. This is going to find a place in my listening room. Maybe the ceiling.

The picture is a few different styles. About $6 a sqft. Very affordable.
 

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I'm sure I will feel very confused like Ron was when he started. People telling you do this and that and having to throttle them back to some degree. I have kept my eyes open for a while. No one pops as the definitive expert on room design for a 2 channel listening room. Lots of people are noted for recording rooms or theatre. And many are engaged in heroic efforts that cost more than my whole house. Im going to have maybe $40k to work this room over. I can only do so much.

you should go by the best systems you heard. or check out more rooms. When you replicate the system, replicate the philosophy as far as possible. For example If you wanted Wilson’s check out Marty’s room for SS or Steve’s for valves and depending on size you have available.

if you liked Howard’s big horns, check with him what he thinks. Too much mixing recommendations, you will end up with SETs driving scintilla in an highly damped square room
 
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There’s also an acoustic variant available that may be better though more expensive. I’m sure there are US suppliers.
https://www.acupanel.co.uk/products/acoustic-slat-wood-panels
These panels have a felt layer behind them and are designed to facilitate conversation - not music reproduction. GIK offers a variation on this architectural paneling with different thicknesses of their absorber material behind it - FYI: https://www.gikacoustics.com/?s=flatfusor&post_type=product
 
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you should go by the best systems you heard. or check out more rooms. When you replicate the system, replicate the philosophy as far as possible. For example If you wanted Wilson’s check out Marty’s room for SS or Steve’s for valves and depending on size you have available.

if you liked Howard’s big horns, check with him what he thinks. Too much mixing recommendations, you will end up with SETs driving scintilla in an highly damped square room
I own the best system I could not afford anymore. Were retired. Its amazing how little distance a few million in the bank gets you. Its sort of sobering. Fortunately I can grow my own food!!!!! Guests will be fed the chicken you pick.from the flock and whatever greens you pick from the garden. I'm not responsible for what my white lightning does to your vision.
 
I own the best system I could not afford anymore.
You can always ask your wife to move back to the city to fund your hobby.
 
Mike L has said I think a detached room makes better sense. I did this having my place 500 miles from my family
it does make sense to me to have a detached room
reg the farm while that sounds great for me going to pickup stuff at farms is more manageable lol.
all the best
 
My room is semi detached. A closed breezeway between the main house and garage.

I am interested in getting a couple tiny homes that would be a sleeping space and bathroom for guests. I enjoy sleeping in a guest house at friends more than the main house. Its nice to have a little privacy when friends are staying for a few days or more.
 
I own the best system I could not afford anymore. Were retired. Its amazing how little distance a few million in the bank gets you. Its sort of sobering.
A million bucks today is equivalent to about $80k after WWII. Of course a $30k house was palatial, and a white collar $10k salary was quite good. And $80k was a great nest egg.
 
I use to go to Whole Foods 5 years ago and was lucky to get out with $100. Now its $100 per bag. Inflation is real. Lets get real political now on why its happening and shut this thread down.
 
I use to go to Whole Foods 5 years ago and was lucky to get out with $100. Now it’s $100 per bag. Inflation is real. Let’s get real political now on why it’s happening and shut this thread down.
A million bucks in 1951 was worth about $475k in 1875.

So the problem is an old one, even if it is accelerating.

Like many threads, once you get beyond two or three pages, it becomes less useful to an interested latecomer.

I won’t add more. I just thought your comment about the value of money might be put in context.

No more from me in this thread. I do have some anecdotes about a friend who built a handful of 600 ft cottages with the goal of renting them via Air BbB. And I do congratulate you on your room

:cool:
 
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A million bucks in 1875 was worth about $475k in 1951.

So the problem is an old one, even if it is accelerating.

Like many threads, once you get beyond two or three pages, it becomes less useful to an interested latecomer.


:cool:
Good point. I should kill this thread and start over when I begin. I to groan when a interesting top pops up and its 20 pages or more.
 
I was hanging out at the new house today with an audio friend. We were checking out the garage and the room above. My friend said the room above was perfect. About 600 feet of room with a tall peak ceiling. It feels like 5/8" drywall and a bit of a dry ring to it. He said leave it alone and get some ASC traps and enjoy the space.

At least the electrical system is right below the space. The panel kind of sucks. An older Eaton panel. Looks tired and oxidized. A real disaster for audio. The data is right there too. I can drop a new data panel and get fresh CAT 6 to the room. My Torus WM45 can mount on the wall near the front of the room directly below where the audio rack will be. I only need a surface mount pipe to feed to it. A pretty easy solution all around.

I said to my wife I can have a stereo set up in no time. She was not amused and said I have to focus on the Mafi Ash floors and kitchen/living room remodel. As well as about 10 other projects. Then I can have a stereo again.
 
If you have a concrete floor in the semi attached some may say use it.
I’m far from an expert but walls move and so do floors
maybe it’s my system but before I gutted it all and put it back it’s a world better now.
next is the wife good luck so who has the money ??
was it her or you ?
For me it was Always me and I still have to lie and sneak around
 
Rex, don’t forget mass loaded vinyl as an option in your wall construction. Saves the extra layer of sheetrock, green glue, etc. Between studs we used BlueJeans insulation, mass loaded vinyl, then the sheetrock. My room has equivalent of RPG BAD panels on top of the sheetrock behind acoustic fabric, if it sucked would be easy to remove the panels the fabric track allows some flexibility to hide treatments and have flexibility for the placement of same.
 
Part of the issue with the garage is 2 load bearing beams in the middle. That would require opening the floor to place structural footer and a massive beam that would be a lot easier to crane in place than jack up from the floor. Its a big structural project.

I would rather drop the ceiling in the garage to add wiring for the room above and while in the cavity, add blocking and plywood strips glued to the floor joist to stiffen the floor.
 
I have steel lots of it lol.
I also dug the entire house down 2 feet to level it out
it had sub cavities for plumbing as well so in addition even lower for pipes
Then 6 inches of concrete with steel mesh
Then 1 inch insulation boards same as used in Madison square garden for ice ring
then 3/4 Marine 100% fill
This was shot into the concrete and glued
3/4 hardwood over this nailed
 

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