Bring On Another Thousand OR Leave Life At The Dock

May 25, 2010
494
1
18
Jersey Shore- waterside
#1
I have been around boats most of my life, but there is a big difference being around boats and owning one--namely lots of money. Put simply you do not buy a boat unless you are willing to put up with the absurdity of expense and lack of ethics that are endemic with boating. For some, a boat is even more of a status symbol than a car. For me a boat is both something I tolerate and love.

I tolerate boating because of the outrageous expense of anything "marine" and the general belief that if you can afford a boat then you will tolerate being ripped off for gas, repairs and general upkeep. BUT I love my boat, actually boats thanks to Sandy (the sale of my older boat was supposed to consummate the day after the storm, BUT......) Meanwhile my newer boat (3 weeks old) sank on shore after it was hauled for the storm and is now being fixed for a mere $5000 plus $1800 hauling fee for 15 minutes work. Anyhow back to why I love my boat(s)---because they are not connected to land and the mundane aspects of my life. I feel great even when I am only 5 feet from my mooring because I am no longer attached to life as I normally live it. Granted it does not hurt that I live on the water and my boat is in my backyard and thus going boating takes about 5 minutes forethought.

But going boating is like going skiing--you are out of your element and need to pay just enough attention so you do not get in trouble, but way less attention than most of us do for a living. This means you have to let go of what is typically occupying your mind. Unfortunately, thanks to Sandy, where I live there are houses and cars and whatever throughout Barnegat Bay so boating will be a bit slower and more cautious this year. However, for a predominantly audio forum, I found an audio solution---I bought a full JL Audio system complete with JL subwoofer for my boat and more than enough JL Class D watts that I and the people on shore can hear it over my gas guzzling 496 cubic inch marine engine.

So now when I am cruising and looking cool my tunes will be with me.
 

slowGEEZR

Member Sponsor
Sep 20, 2010
1,263
0
36
66
Round Rock, Texas
#2
Hey, whatever floats your boat. :D When I was a teenager living in Orlando, Florida we had our boat dock behind the house. Great for water skiing. Later in life, when I got re-interested in boating, it was the sailing bug that bit me. Instead of buying a sailboat, I just joined a sailing club out of Annapolis and was spared the expense of ownership.
 

audioguy

WBF Founding Member
Apr 21, 2010
2,731
6
38
Near Atlanta, GA but not too near!
#4
I've owned a sail boat (16 foot Hobie) and a number of power boats/ cruisers up to 38 feet. When I purchased the last boat, the sales guy, with a great sense of humor said: " before I sell anyone a boat I have them stand on the end of the dock and throw $1000 into the water and then go home and take an ice cold shower. And if they truly enjoyed both of those, then they would probably enjoy owning a boat"
 
May 25, 2010
494
1
18
Jersey Shore- waterside
#5
All one can do is sigh and eat desert!
I've owned a sail boat (16 foot Hobie) and a number of power boats/ cruisers up to 38 feet. When I purchased the last boat, the sales guy, with a great sense of humor said: " before I sell anyone a boat I have them stand on the end of the dock and throw $1000 into the water and then go home and take an ice cold shower. And if they truly enjoyed both of those, then they would probably enjoy owning a boat"
 

cjfrbw

Active Member
Apr 20, 2010
2,161
2
38
Pleasanton, CA
#6
Used to walk AROUND the Santa Cruz Harbor. When I started stand up paddle boarding, I spend a lot of time IN the Harbor, an entirely different experience. It is like a neighborhood on the water, people recognize you after a while, all different types. Seals nearly knock me off the board, and seeing the salmon, birds, seals and otters in the harbor close up is pretty amazing. Some of the boats are simply awesome looking, sleek expensive toys.

However, on weekend, it is clear that a lot of people with rudimentary skills are out on their status symbols partying. I saw a yuppie break the rudder of his magnificent large boat just trying to lift it out of the water on a trailer. I think the fact that most of these people make it out onto the ocean and back alive means that Mother Ocean is a bit more forgiving than I thought.
 

Matt193

New Member
Mar 21, 2011
193
0
0
Wisconsin
#8
Used to walk AROUND the Santa Cruz Harbor. When I started stand up paddle boarding, I spend a lot of time IN the Harbor, an entirely different experience. It is like a neighborhood on the water, people recognize you after a while, all different types. Seals nearly knock me off the board, and seeing the salmon, birds, seals and otters in the harbor close up is pretty amazing. Some of the boats are simply awesome looking, sleek expensive toys.

However, on weekend, it is clear that a lot of people with rudimentary skills are out on their status symbols partying. I saw a yuppie break the rudder of his magnificent large boat just trying to lift it out of the water on a trailer. I think the fact that most of these people make it out onto the ocean and back alive means that Mother Ocean is a bit more forgiving than I thought.
If you want to be entertained for a few hours, take a lawn chair and sit at your local boat launch watching people put their boats in and out of the water. I think all logic and reason flies out the window when you're at a launch.

Here is an all to typical scenario that I see:

A guy, usually driving some over accessorized pickup or large SUV pulls up to the launch and impatiently waits his turn. Once it's his turn he tries to back his decked out ski boat down the ramp but is unable to do so in a straight line taking up both launch spots. When 3/4 of the way down the ramp, he stops and takes the straps off of his boat and installs the plug into the transom. After that he either backs the boat too far into the water because he forgot to unhook the bow from the trailer or tries to drag his boat off the trailer without getting his tires wet. Once he finally finagles his boat off the trailer, he has a person hold on to a rope (usually the bow) while he goes and parks his rig. Since no one but him is allowed to drive his boat into a slip due to the fear of dock rash, the rear of the boat has now drifted out into the middle of the launch rendering it useless for others to use or the boat is slamming up against the side of the dock from wave action. After the guy finds a parking spot and walks all the way back to the launch they then start to load their 5 coolers, 3 tubes, a couple of dogs, and a few children. Once they have everything situated they hit the key and find that the battery is dead or their boat won't start. This process usually takes 15+ minutes.

A person who is competent in backing up a trailer and has their boat prepped and packed can launch their boat and have it in a slip in a matter of a few minutes.

/rant :D
 

Mosin

[Industry Expert]
Mar 11, 2012
894
0
0
#9
This much I know...

I don't ever want to own a boat, and when I hire one it needs to have at least two motors because I am very interested in being able to return to my point of origin. The same would apply to a plane, especially to a plane.

The last time I hired a boat it was one that had two Volvo engines. Sure enough, one quit working. Sailboats? Fuggedaboudit!
 

Dimfer

Member Sponsor
May 8, 2010
452
0
16
Canada
#12
my 85 yr old boss lives a frugal life (for the most part), ten years ago he told me his dream car is a Subaru Legend but has not bought one yet till now, he drives a Ford Escape. But when it comes to boat, it is a different story - he dropped a million bucks for a boat that he use less than 10 times a year because he lives in Edmonton (Canada) and his boat is docked somewhere in Seattle. The guy also own a cabin by a lake where he had numerous smaller boats. He keeps numerous boats in our building (my guys call them junk) including a 15' wooden sailboat he imported from England in the 1960's.

He said a week in the water is equivalent to months on land.
 
#13
Or, if you don't live on a lake, you want a boat so you can pretend you do :)

We use ours as our "Cabin on the Lake". Even if we never leave the slip and just hang out in the cockpit with a cocktail and watch the water and other boats go by it's quite relaxing.

Can be a lot of work (or money) though. We have a big ole woody, 1954 Chris Craft Conqueror so there is a lot of stripping sanding and varnishing. Or a lot of paying someone else to do the stripping sanding and varnishing :) Still cheaper than buying a cabin on a lake, and unlike a cabin or vacation home, it moves!
 

mep

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 21, 2010
9,483
0
0
#14
I have always heard that the two happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day they buy a boat and the day they sell the boat.
 

rockitman

Member Sponsor
Sep 20, 2011
6,891
21
38
Northern NY
#15
I have always heard that the two happiest days in a boat owner's life is the day they buy a boat and the day they sell the boat.
Maybe, if you don't live on a lake and need to trailer it, store it and Moore it. It all costs money. One thing for sure, a boat you can sleep on and rent dock space for is far cheaper than a lake house and boat. Boating is a great time and very relaxing. Stress if you have it, just fades away depending where you are boating. I am boating tomorrow. This will be the second time in a week this season
 

cjfrbw

Active Member
Apr 20, 2010
2,161
2
38
Pleasanton, CA
#16
Makes the stand up paddle board sound like a bargain. Plus you can catch some waves and do minor surfing, paddle up and down the coast.

Seals aren't supposed to be a problem on the ocean, but I saw three big heads outside of the kelp beds last week. One of them looked like it spotted me. In a matter of seconds, it was half way to me. In a couple of more seconds, a HUGE elephant seal head popped out of the water about 20 feet away. It really scared me, even though I doubt it had any malign intent, and I paddled like a mad dog back to where there were more people. There are lots of smaller seals in the surf areas, they pop their head out and look like cute puppy dogs, but I would'nt want to approach one.
 

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