The oldest most massive black hole ever

ack

VIP/Donor & WBF Founding Member
May 6, 2010
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#1
http://www.sciencealert.com/supermassive-black-hole-quasar-epoch-of-reionisation-j1342-0928

[FONT=&quot]An absolutely gargantuan black hole 800 million times the mass of the Sun has been discovered 13 billion light-years away, and it's sent the way we think about the early Universe into a spin.
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It's the most distant black hole ever detected, from when the Universe was just 5 percent of its current age - around 690 million years after the Big Bang.
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#2
That really sucks - could not resist. :rolleyes:

Most people have no idea how vast the universe really is.

Did you know that there are billions, probably trillions of stars that we will never see on earth? Why?

Because the universe is expanding and accelerating, the light from those stars cannot beat the expansion speed and therefore those photons will never reach the earth and our telescopes. Our visible universe is a finite big sphere.

Given the scale of the universe, the speed of light is actually really really slow compared to the distances involved. The closest star besides the sun is 50 million light years away.

Steve N.
Empirical Audio
 
Sep 4, 2017
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#4
The two main stars are Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B, which form a binary pair. They are an average of 4.3 light-years from Earth. The third star is Proxima Centauri. It is about 4.22 light-years from Earth and is the closest star other than the sun.
 
Feb 8, 2011
18,730
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Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#5
Last edited:
#7
The two main stars are Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B, which form a binary pair. They are an average of 4.3 light-years from Earth. The third star is Proxima Centauri. It is about 4.22 light-years from Earth and is the closest star other than the sun.
My error. It was the closest other galaxy I think that is 50 million light years.

Steve N.
 
Sep 4, 2017
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#8
My error. It was the closest other galaxy I think that is 50 million light years.

Steve N.
At a distance of about 2.5 million light years, the Andromeda galaxy (also known as NGC 224 and M31) is the nearest galaxy to the Earth apart from smaller companion galaxies such as the Magellanic Clouds. Like the Milky Way, Andromeda is a spiral galaxy.
 
Feb 8, 2011
18,730
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36
Vancouver Island, B.C. Canada
#9
It would be cool if we could build a super spaceship fast enough, omega ultra high speed internet, so that we can land on other galaxies of the universe and start exploring the possibilities of a better life. :b

Utopia.
 
Sep 4, 2017
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#10
It would be cool if we could build a super spaceship fast enough, omega ultra high speed internet, so that we can land on other galaxies of the universe and start exploring the possibilities of a better life. :b

Utopia.
A recent vision of what this might be like was "Interstellar." This short clip of the making of the Interstellar soundtrack got me interested - an entertaining flick.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_8t2VlwK4w
 
#11

Ron Resnick

Co-Owner, Administrator
Jan 25, 2015
5,031
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Beverly Hills, CA
#13
#14
:b Ron, I said that because I was thinking of Tesla and Bitcoin. But you knew that.

It is a subject that I find fascinating; space exploration, science of the universe, man's conquest of the unknown, the Big Bang, Black Holes, far away galaxies, how we became to be where we are today, and what have we learned so far. Maybe all matter is related, interconnected...in time, in space, in synchronicity?
Each planet has its own organism and system, its own destiny...momentary time lapse?
Who knows if Earth one day will not encounter a gargantuan black hole and be sucked into it through the other side, in another galaxy of the universe, with artificial intelligence living in lush Amazon jungles?

It is incredible that man have such powerful telescopes and can measure such long distances.
That latest discovery of that gigantic black hole is mind boggling...just to get there. Maybe it's a portal for reversing the course of singularity?

Anyway, I love everything, including Interstellar and other great sci-fi flicks of that caliber. ...We all do, and it brings us closer to each other in this vast and ever expanding space of the universe...Hollywood and all.

It is in man's nature to go beyond the stars.