Bybee Bullets

mep

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 21, 2010
9,483
0
0
#2
Why Keith, weren't you just telling me I was being unfair in my post on cables? And now maybe you think you have caught a wiff of snake-oil with the Bybee Bullets? Maybe he sources his gold from a special mine in South Africa that no one else knows about.
 

LL21

Active Member
Dec 26, 2010
10,547
0
36
#3
I too would be curious to know...particularly given the Bybee power rails which even the GNSC Wadia Modd'd products apparently use.
 

FrantzM

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
6,469
0
0
#4
One can onl loooove the reviewers conclusion . I hope I am not infringing any copyright item in which case I would ask the moderators to kindly remove it ...

I would recommend, at a minimum, a pair of bullets between your phono cables and phono stage, and a pair between your preamp and amp, if single-ended. In my book, the resulting system benefits overall are not possible with any other treatment or accessory in existence by any other manufacturer.
That would set you back about $4200 for this .err ... "filter" ...
and of course the reviewers has heard in his system all treatments or accessories in existence :confused: if that phrase only doesn't set your BS-o-meter ablaze you deserve to have these in your system
 

DonH50

Member Sponsor & WBF Technical Expert
Jun 23, 2010
3,521
2
38
Monument, CO
#5
1/f noise from what, I wonder? And how high a level? And, a filter that blocks 1/f noise is a series capacitor... I am clearly missing the boat in terms of making money on audiophiles.
 

FrantzM

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
6,469
0
0
#6
1/f noise from what, I wonder? And how high a level? And, a filter that blocks 1/f noise is a series capacitor... I am clearly missing the boat in terms of making money on audiophiles.
The "1/f distortion", according to the reviewer is also .... "classified" Only Bybee knows about it ... I would like to know the profit margins on such products ... 10,000% is not out of line ... Don , you are definitely missing the boat ...
 

andi

New Member
Apr 9, 2012
84
0
0
Germany
#10
Some Bullet DIY

Inspired by this thread, I did some DIY yesterday.
Four Slipstreams were installled into the phonowire.

Something is going on. Of course there are more solderjoints than before. That could cause some colouration.

But there is a clearer midrange and the bass is more definend.
I feel that there are less dynamics.

I will listen to them for the next days and let you know if I will live with this tweak until my last hour.

Andreas
 
Last edited:

fas42

Addicted To Best
Jan 8, 2011
3,973
0
0
NSW Australia
#11
My take on these devices is that they function as suppression beads, in a similar or same way as ferrites, absorbing or suppressing EMI, high frequency noise. If there is a problem around then they will probably have a decent effect, but probably similar will be achieved by knowledgable addition of much, much cheaper normal and easily obtainable parts ...

Frank
 

Ronm1

Member Sponsor
Feb 21, 2011
1,746
0
0
wtOMitMutb NH
#12
I have bb's in my Bpt 2.5, P3b, DDsPro supply. As I've mentioned before I'm sort of an anti noise freak. Blackness is not the enemy, but something one should strive towards.
 
Jul 1, 2010
8,713
0
0
#13
It's a wire. It can also be an antenna. Shield the thing. It can also be a filter, and that cannot be a good thing unless someone can explain how a wire knows what to filter and what to let through. And that, evidently, is a trade secret. With that said, I'm sure people will drop the money and hear every dime.

Tim
 

DonH50

Member Sponsor & WBF Technical Expert
Jun 23, 2010
3,521
2
38
Monument, CO
#15
My take on these devices is that they function as suppression beads, in a similar or same way as ferrites, absorbing or suppressing EMI, high frequency noise. If there is a problem around then they will probably have a decent effect, but probably similar will be achieved by knowledgable addition of much, much cheaper normal and easily obtainable parts ...

Frank
The claim is they reduce 1/f noise, which is LF noise, so it must be more of a HPF than a LPF, thus my comment about it being a capacitor (not an inductor/bead).

Adding beads for RFI/EMI suppression makes sense and can help in some cases, but of course you can add ferrites (or capacitors) for much less than $2100...
 

garylkoh

WBF Technical Expert (Speakers & Audio Equipment)
#16
The claim is they reduce 1/f noise, which is LF noise, so it must be more of a HPF than a LPF, thus my comment about it being a capacitor (not an inductor/bead).

Adding beads for RFI/EMI suppression makes sense and can help in some cases, but of course you can add ferrites (or capacitors) for much less than $2100...
After a year, and over 2000 posts on WBF, I have come to the conclusion that most audiophiles are so insecure in their beliefs that they want to pay $2,100. I've found the the most reasonable people here (like you, Don) actually play an instrument.
 

DonH50

Member Sponsor & WBF Technical Expert
Jun 23, 2010
3,521
2
38
Monument, CO
#17
Thanks Gary. Interestingly enough, I have found through the years that musicians often (not always) make poor test subjects for audio system testing. They tend to listen to the music, not the gear, and are more likely to notice the flatted fifth (should be sharp in a major chord) in a passage than what audiophiles would consider unacceptable noise and distortion, let alone the very subtle nuances debated so hotly and at great length on so many audio forums.
 

MylesBAstor

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
11,221
0
0
#18
Thanks Gary. Interestingly enough, I have found through the years that musicians often (not always) make poor test subjects for audio system testing. They tend to listen to the music, not the gear, and are more likely to notice the flatted fifth (should be sharp in a major chord) in a passage than what audiophiles would consider unacceptable noise and distortion, let alone the very subtle nuances debated so hotly and at great length on so many audio forums.
And recording engineers listen for every mistake in recording and mastering.
 

DonH50

Member Sponsor & WBF Technical Expert
Jun 23, 2010
3,521
2
38
Monument, CO
#19
I am not sure I get your point? Mistakes in the mix and mastering, or mistakes by the players? My recording days are amateur now, and I had only a little pro experience in the past, but we spent a lot of time agonizing over the mix, splicing takes to get the best recording, optimizing the sound, etc. Some artists were much more concerned about a mistake than others, and of course live recordings are "as-is". Recording and mastering time is expensive, so a lot of recordings let minor mistakes slip through. Perhaps the biggest issue in the mastering is deciding upon your target audience and what they will be listening on. Do you mix for the car, the average stereo system, the guy with the $100k+ system? Ultimately the market will decide if you chose rightly, but choose wrong too many times and you'll be looking for work.
 

MylesBAstor

Member Sponsor & WBF Founding Member
Apr 20, 2010
11,221
0
0
#20
I am not sure I get your point? Mistakes in the mix and mastering, or mistakes by the players? My recording days are amateur now, and I had only a little pro experience in the past, but we spent a lot of time agonizing over the mix, splicing takes to get the best recording, optimizing the sound, etc. Some artists were much more concerned about a mistake than others, and of course live recordings are "as-is". Recording and mastering time is expensive, so a lot of recordings let minor mistakes slip through. Perhaps the biggest issue in the mastering is deciding upon your target audience and what they will be listening on. Do you mix for the car, the average stereo system, the guy with the $100k+ system? Ultimately the market will decide if you chose rightly, but choose wrong too many times and you'll be looking for work.
Both. Like on how Herb Alpert all of a sudden speeds up to catch up with the rest of the instruments on Casino Royale. ;)