Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 64

Thread: Best Exercise Machine For Overall Workout

  1. #1
    Site Founder And Administrator Steve Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Coto De Caza, California on the 13th fairway of the south golf course
    Posts
    18,037

    Best Exercise Machine For Overall Workout

    So back to my quest to convert a room in my home to one for exercise.

    Presently I have an older but still very functional Precor stationery bike which is still useable with an onscreen display and multiple courses of varying skil levels. It is my hope in the future to switch this to a pro version of Life Fitness cyles and perhaps to add a Life Fitness treadmill. Seems as if past discussions here have tried to dissuade me from adding an Elliptical. The room is ~ 12' X 12'

    I am definitely leaning towards the pro versions of any model only because I feel they are more reliable and hopefully will also be more challenging re built in programs. So to all of you gym rats ( Myles and Lee and ?), if you were to only purchase one machine that would give the best overall workout what would you recommend?

    BTW, a rowing machine hasn't been excluded asa 3rd machine but our first thoughts were treadmill, stationary bike and possibly a rowing machine if there is space remaining to do such
    Steve Williams
    aka oneobgyn
    There's ALWAYS another Steve Williams BUT there's only "oneobgyn"
    Industry Affiliation........Lamm Dealer
    My System

  2. #2
    WBF Founding Member and Super Moderator RBFC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,325

    Thumbs up #1 workout device

    Steve, if you can only have one machine, IMO it should be the treadmill. Exercise that encourages weight-bearing is invaluable for maintaining bone density. As long as you or your wife have no medical conditions that would be contra-indications for walking as exercise, I believe the treadmill will offer you the best overall value.

    A recumbent bicycle as a second choice is fine. The seating position eliminates the perineal discomfort and pressure ischemia issues that can occur with upright bicycle seating postures.

    The elliptical is not yet a completely ergonomic concept. As we walk/run faster, our stride length naturally increases. This does not occur on an elliptical, as the stride length is fixed. We therefore adopt an unnatural "shuffling" motion that is not duplicated when we perform the movements in free space.

    If space is a concern, the Concept 2 rower I previously mentioned disassembles (in half) in about 2 seconds.. no joke.

    My concern is that folks who don't do anything but "cardio" do no weight-bearing work for their upper body. Real life often requires us to lift objects, carry them, etc. We don't want our everyday chores to push us to our maximal effort zone, as this risks injury. We must be familiar with the mechanics of lifting various shapes, and have sufficient strength and coordination to support those activities. Imagine being able to schlep your amps around, etc. any time you wish without concerns. I think you understand what I'm driving at. I offered the rower as a means of maintaining the lower back and shoulder girdle. If you have it covered with weights, etc., then you don't necessarily need the rower just to do a different kind of cardio.

    Maintaining muscle mass as we age is the key to avoiding the typical metabolic demand/eating imbalances that slowly make us fatter. As you shop for cardio equipment, please keep this fact in mind as something that the cardio will supplement.

    I'm 53 and I carry my Krell EVO 403 amp around by myself. Much simpler than waiting interminably for a friend to get freed up and become ambitious enough to spend time helping me with my stuff. The work you put in pays off, sir.

    Good luck. Call me anytime if you have questions.

    Lee

  3. #3
    Site Founder And Administrator Steve Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Coto De Caza, California on the 13th fairway of the south golf course
    Posts
    18,037
    Thanks Lee

    Perhaps then get rid of the stationary bike and get the treadmill first and then the rower.

    BTW I am not a big fan of those recumbent bikes. Probably because I am a creature of habit and not used to working those muscle groups whereas you hit it right on....I usually don't do anything except cardio but I am older than all you buffed out dudes
    Steve Williams
    aka oneobgyn
    There's ALWAYS another Steve Williams BUT there's only "oneobgyn"
    Industry Affiliation........Lamm Dealer
    My System

  4. #4
    WBF Founding Member Ron Party's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    2,346
    My wife's been on my case to purchase a stationary bike. Steve, maybe I can take yours off your hands. Which model Precor do you have?

  5. #5
    Site Founder And Administrator Steve Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Coto De Caza, California on the 13th fairway of the south golf course
    Posts
    18,037
    I'll have to look it up when I get home Ron. It still works fine
    Steve Williams
    aka oneobgyn
    There's ALWAYS another Steve Williams BUT there's only "oneobgyn"
    Industry Affiliation........Lamm Dealer
    My System

  6. #6
    WBF Founding Member and Super Moderator RBFC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,325
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Williams View Post
    .I usually don't do anything except cardio but I am older than all you buffed out dudes
    Steve, studies have shown that even 90+ yr. olds can achieve impressive gains in muscle density/strength in a fairly short time using a progressive weight training regimen. I'm not talking about lifting 200# or anything like that. Simply, by challenging the muscle with a load that forces it to strain slightly, you provide the stimulus to build the muscle. This also stimulates increases in bone density, as the skeleton wishes to be able to support the loads that are being put upon it. A basic dumbbell lifting program would suffice to achieve these goals, nothing fancy.

    Here's a link to an adjustable dumbbell system that takes virtually no storage space:

    http://www.amazon.com/PowerBlock-Spo...4297140&sr=1-2

    They also have sets that go heavier, just in case you're being your usual demure self.....!

    Lee

  7. #7
    Site Founder And Administrator Steve Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Coto De Caza, California on the 13th fairway of the south golf course
    Posts
    18,037
    This is not being demure or modest but truthful.

    My biggest challenge is my arthritic knees.
    Steve Williams
    aka oneobgyn
    There's ALWAYS another Steve Williams BUT there's only "oneobgyn"
    Industry Affiliation........Lamm Dealer
    My System

  8. #8
    WBF Founding Member/Member Sponsor MylesBAstor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    11,429
    Quote Originally Posted by RBFC View Post
    Steve, studies have shown that even 90+ yr. olds can achieve impressive gains in muscle density/strength in a fairly short time using a progressive weight training regimen. I'm not talking about lifting 200# or anything like that. Simply, by challenging the muscle with a load that forces it to strain slightly, you provide the stimulus to build the muscle. This also stimulates increases in bone density, as the skeleton wishes to be able to support the loads that are being put upon it. A basic dumbbell lifting program would suffice to achieve these goals, nothing fancy.

    Here's a link to an adjustable dumbbell system that takes virtually no storage space:

    http://www.amazon.com/PowerBlock-Spo...4297140&sr=1-2

    They also have sets that go heavier, just in case you're being your usual demure self.....!

    Lee
    Lee-

    I remember when these DB first came out in the '90s and they tried to get the person I was training with, Frank Zane, to rep their product. Went no where back then but obviously they've stuck around
    Myles B. Astor, PhD
    Senior Assistant Editor, Positive-Feedback Online, www.positive-feedback.com;
    Executive Editor, www.AVShowrooms.com

    Skepticism is the sadism of embittered souls.

    There is something to be said in doing things wrong the exact same way every time. Itís not a good thing, but still.

  9. #9
    WBF Founding Member/Member Sponsor MylesBAstor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    11,429
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Williams View Post
    This is not being demure or modest but truthful.

    My biggest challenge is my arthritic knees.
    Steve-

    Given the info provided, I'll tell you what I would tell my clients.

    1. You need to do a daily strengthening program for your knees that would involve working the quadriceps in particular, with the least stress on the knee (s). The days of heavy resistance training are over and you should be doing higher reps (15-25) with lighter weight for your legs. The goal is to strengthen the muscles around the knee (and hip) to take stress off the affected joint. Depending on the exercise, unloading the weight and reducing the joint's time under tension, is a good idea. Suggested exercises: straight leg raises, unloaded knee ext., etc.

    2. Hip work: a pair of ankle wts and/or some minibands are a good choice here. Again the goal is to strengthen the muscles at the hip so the femur doesn't rotate and bang the patella. Suggested exercises: Hip Ab/Ad, extension, flexion with bands or ankle wts. There's also some multidirectional single leg work one can do with st. legs so as to improve hip strength. FYI: cardio is not going to increase strength, just improve your cardiovacular function eg. cardio turns on cell signal pathways such as AMPK that preserve energy and shut down protein synthesis as compared to resistance training that turns on cell signal pathways that trigger protein synthesis thru the mTor pathway.

    3. Flexibility: It's important to maintain your joint ROM. I also strongly support some good soft tissue work eg. not touchy feely massage. Get someone that knows ART (active release therapy) and let them work on your legs esp. the IT band, hip muscles, fibularis longus and brevis and calves. Tight calves can also lead to knee pain as they pull the knee posteriorly. In the end, it's about improving your posture so that you have better biomechanics and less stress on the knees (and its those subtle changes in biomechanics that are often responsible for back pain).

    4. You can try glucosamine; there are a number of forumulations around though the clinical studies seem to show works best with moderate cases of arthritis. Another thing you can look into is the Flector patch to ease pain symptoms. It's a RX topical antiinflammatory patch that can work very well in some individuals.

    5. Cardio. Based on your knees, I don't think the treadmill (and certainly not running!) is the best choice (if you need to walk, there the street!). You need to do low impact type cardio; therefore, the bike or elliptical might be a better choice. There's many types of ellipticals out there and would suggest trying them to see how they feel on your knees. There's Precor (I'd take it over the LF and they differ in one aspect in their stride length), Lifefitness, Cybex (more of a swinging motion), Octane (I like these machine too), etc.

    6. Last but not least is core training--but we're not talking about doing 100s of crunches. Crunches actually can be harmful to the spine and posture. What you need to be doing to start out are simple exercises that improve trunk stability and allow the limbs to move properly via training the "inner core or pelvic floor/Trans. Ab/multifidus" via not the dopey way, drawing in, but through breathing patterns. Second is do core work that works the more superficial core musculature.
    Last edited by MylesBAstor; 05-19-2010 at 02:16 PM.
    Myles B. Astor, PhD
    Senior Assistant Editor, Positive-Feedback Online, www.positive-feedback.com;
    Executive Editor, www.AVShowrooms.com

    Skepticism is the sadism of embittered souls.

    There is something to be said in doing things wrong the exact same way every time. Itís not a good thing, but still.

  10. #10
    Site Founder And Administrator Steve Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Coto De Caza, California on the 13th fairway of the south golf course
    Posts
    18,037
    This really has to be The Best Forum. Where else can I get a free consult and recommended program of physical exercise to do from fellow audiophiles

    You guys are great
    Steve Williams
    aka oneobgyn
    There's ALWAYS another Steve Williams BUT there's only "oneobgyn"
    Industry Affiliation........Lamm Dealer
    My System

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-17-2012, 12:49 PM
  2. Best 10 min workout to boost energy?
    By JackD201 in forum Health And Fitness
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 05-26-2012, 11:15 PM
  3. Plantar fasciitis and exercise machine
    By amirm in forum Health And Fitness
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 06-17-2010, 07:29 AM
  4. Recommendations For Exercise equipment For The House
    By Steve Williams in forum Health And Fitness
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-03-2010, 05:21 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •